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Peninsula Astronomical Society

Join us on our FaceBook page at: www.facebook.com/PeninsulaAstronomicalSociety

Subject: Looking for help to support Oct 5 Foothill Star Party

Hi Everyone,

Next Saturday, Oct 5, is both national Astronomy Day (the fall version)
and Int'l Observe the Moon Night,  so the PAS plans to host a star party
at Foothill Observatory in observance.
We are seeking volunteers to bring out their telescopes to setup outside
the Observatory to share with the public.
Given that sunset on Oct 5 is 6:47pm and civil twilight is at 7:13pm,
we are advertising a 7:00pm start time and will run until as late as 11:00pm
depending on the crowds.
Please consider helping PAS share the evening of Oct 5 with the public.
If you can participate, please email me at
(gj_baker at yahoo dot com) to let me know.

Thank you very much.

Gary
PAS President

PAS Invitation
     



Fremont Peak Obsevatory Association

FPOA Spring Newsletter .pdf, local copy.

FPOA Summer Newsletter .pdf, local copy.
 
 
        UCSC

Extra-solar Planet Search
http://www.oklo.org/
 
     
 
NASA Exploration Center  
 
   

Planets around other stars, extra-solar planets

TESS Exoplanet Mission

Kepler Mission

 
   

Planetary Geology
Design your own Lunar, Martian or Astrodial fly over
using actual data from Planetary probes.
(Parts of trek are still under beta test.)

https://trek.nasa.gov/
 
 

Gravity Wave Detectors

LIGO, Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory.
Links:
https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/detection-companion-papers

https://www.gw-openscience.org/start/

https://wiki.gw-astronomy.org/OpenLVEM/WebHome

Virgo in Italy http://www.virgo-gw.eu/
 
    
 Chabot Space and Science Center
 
 

Return to oct.htm


In the email

For more recent email go to nov-mail.htm 


In the email

Some of us had visited the LSST at SLAC a few months back.
Saw a news item last week that the LSST lens (world's largest optical lens) has been delivered at SLAC.
Album posted by SLAC


In the email

Dear UC Astronomers,

On August 1st, the IEEE will dedicate a bronze plaque at Lick Observatory's Shane Telescope
honoring Lick's Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LURE).
LURE measured the distance to the moon using a retroreflector emplaced there by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

This is a very nice honor from the IEEE.
LURE joins the varied and notable ranks of other IEEE Milestone honorees.
Among these are the reception of the first transatlantic radio signals,
the first semiconductor integrated circuit, the first atomic clock, Moore's Law,
the first public demonstration of television, high temperature superconductivity,
and interactive video games. Quite a nice crowd to be associated with, if you ask me!

I want to call your attention to two nice press releases related to the event:

1) Lick Observatory commemorates Apollo 11 experiment on 50th anniversary describes the plaque
and the laser ranging technology used to measure the distance to the moon.

2) Apollo 11 anniversary: Lick Observatory scientists recall landmark experiment 40 years ago,
in which UC scientists who were present at the laser ranging event describe how the experiment
was rapidly put together for NASA, and what it has meant to them on a more personal level.

Best regards,
Claire Max  

More on this subject.


In the email

NASA video, how cooronagraphs are used to find extra solar Planets
https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/coronagraphvideo/


In the email

Synthetic Aperature Radar, on UTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MViVyocQhVw


In the email

Stanford Gravitationl Wave, lecture on UTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-i_ARhHfbpg 


In the email

email is listed with the most recent at the top.

 

 



Ken L's Bay Astro Event List,
Most recent at the top


For years, Kenneth Lum of EAS (and SMCAS ) has been compiling and distributing to EAS members a listing of upcoming events
pertinent to astronomy topics.
For some years now, I have been updating the AANC calendar page with that information,
but have not let the AANC contacts list know about it.
So the purpose of this message is to let you know about the update of the AANC calendar page.
https://sites.google.com/site/aancsite/calendar

-Alan Gould



 


Monday, 10/28/19

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM



Varian Physics Building

382 Via Pueblo Mall

Room 355

Stanford, CA 94305



Searching for supermassive black hole binaries



Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) are a natural byproduct of galaxy mergers. Yet, they remain undetectable at small separations. A promising method is to identify quasars with periodic variability. I will discuss candidates identified in time-domain surveys, as well as ongoing efforts to confirm their binary nature. I will also describe efforts to detect gravitational waves from SMBHBs with Pulsar Timing Arrays and constraints on tentative binaries in the local universe from the most recent NANOGrav upper limits.



Speaker: Maria Charisi, Caltech



Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/searching-supermassive-black-hole-binaries



Cost: Free



==================================



Monday, 10/28/19 12:10 PM



Campbell Hall, Rm 131

UC Berkeley

Berkeley, CA 94720



What have we learnt about relativistic outflows from GW170817?

Speaker: Ore Gottlieb, Tel Aviv



Website: Click to VisiCost: Free



==================================



Monday, 10/28/19

07:00 PM - 09:30 PM



Club 21

2111 Franklin St

Oakland, CA 94612



Nerd Nite East Bay: Barnacles, Chevron Richmond, Martian Atmosphere

Shaped By Chevron: How Oil, WWII and Migration Created Richmond



In an echo of the corporate towns of America’s past, learn why Chevron was built in Richmond or, more accurately, how Chevron built Richmond around the massive oil refinery. See how World War II and the second Great Migration bifurcated Richmond, and learn how Chevron Richmond’s control over city development and media amplified the division between Richmond and North Richmond and moved the center of Richmond city life from downtown to a 1970s mall overlooking the Bay.



Speaker: Mia Renauld



================



Resurrecting the Martian Atmosphere for Human Life



Mars is humanity’s most obvious and viable escape from a future inhospitable Earth, but the leap from our world to the Red Planet will require a nearly inconceivable amount of work on the Martian atmosphere. Learn why Mars was once warm and wet, with majestic flowing river and beautiful lakes, and what happened to make modern Mars so cold, dry, and incompatible with human life. Then hear about current projects that are preparing Mars for human colonization, why terraforming is crucial to the reformation of Mars’ atmosphere, and why human life on Mars will require digging a channel one billion times the size of the tunnel between England and France.



Speaker: Rob Lillis, UC Berkeley



===============



Using Fossil Barnacles to Track Ancient Whale Migration



Learn how fossil barnacles can be used to track the migration of prehistoric whales and answer questions about ancient and modern whale behavior. See how barnacles give us crucial insight into the morphological evolution of whales and how they can identify hot spots of productivity in the ancient oceans. Learn how fossils suggest Pleistocene Panama was once party central for ancient leviathans, discover how whales change behavior in response to changes in Earth’s climate, and see how modern barnacles accurately map whale migration.



Speaker: Larry Taylor, UC Berkeley



Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/391516395118756/



Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door



==================================



Tuesday, 10/29/19

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM



Varian Physics Building

382 Via Pueblo Mall

Room 355

Stanford, CA 94305



Two KIPAC Tea Talks



Berti: Testing Galaxy Assembly Bias with PRIMUS



The "halo model" of galaxy evolution assumes all properties of a galaxy are determined statistically by the mass of its dark matter halo. While this assumption yields predictions that largely agree with observations, the full picture of the connection between galaxies and halos is incomplete without assembly bias. Probes of galaxy assembly bias include galactic conformity and the differential clustering of star-forming and quiescent central galaxies at fixed stellar mass. I will show that two-halo galactic conformity may not be a real effect, and demonstrate that efforts to refine galaxy evolution models should instead focus on correlations between halo accretion rate and galaxy properties like star formation rate.



Speaker: Angela Berti, UC San Diego



Electronics for precision cosmology: challenges in multiplexed readout of large detector arrays with the Simons Array CMB polarization experiment



Speaker: John Groh, UC Berkeley



Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/berti-testing-galaxy-assembly-bias-primus-groh-electronics-precision-cosmology-challenges



Cost: Free



==================================



Tuesday, 10/29/19. 1:10 PM



Campbell Hall, Rm 131

UC Berkeley

Berkeley, CA 94720



From dark matter to observed skies, creating a universe with state-of-the-art simulations



Preparations for upcoming cosmological surveys such as LSST can benefit greatly from the use of simulated observations, however creating realistic galaxy catalogs is an incredibly complex and challenging task. In this talk I will first discuss how such simulations can aid in the interpretation of modern cosmological datasets. I will then detail the creation of the cosmoDC2 synthetic sky catalog built for the LSST-DESC collaboration, with a particular focus on the development of the weak lensing pipeline. Finally I will discuss lessons learnt in the context of a future synthetic galaxy catalog currently in the early stages of development.



Speaker: Particia Larsen, ANL



Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html



Cost: Free



==================================



Tuesday, 10/29/19

04:30 PM - 05:30 PM



Hewlett Teaching Center

370 Serra Mall, Room 200

Stanford University

Stanford, CA 94305



Tension between early and late universe measurements of H0: Hint of new physics?



Prof.Tommaso Treu of UC Los Angeles will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium



Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/tension-between-early-and-late-universe-measurements-h0-hint-new-physics



Cost: Free



=================================



Thursday, 10/31/19

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM



Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)

Building 51

3rd Floor Conference room

Menlo Park, CA 94025



All Hands on Deck: What observations, theory, simulation and laboratory experiments are teaching us about the powerful AGN jets



Powerful jets from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are observed on scales from Mpc down to astronomical units, from essentially all observable wavebands and via multi-messengers. These enigmatic sources could hold the key to several long-standing mysteries such as ultra-high energy cosmic rays and more recently the origin of high-energy ~ PeV neutrinos. Understanding such sources has strongly influenced the development of (general) relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and kinetic plasma astrophysics, including even laboratory experiments. We present observational and theoretical/numerical modeling results that link the large-scale global morphologies with small-scale particle energization processes. We discuss how the behavior of magnetic fields can shift the framework within which we interpret the AGN jets/lobes. These include their lobe polarization properties, lobe energy composition, Fermi flares and their corresponding optical polarization properties, as well as the efficient particle acceleration by the dissipation of jet magnetic fields, studied via comprehensive multi-dimensional plasma kinetic simulations. Future prospects of progress in simulations, experiments and observations will be discussed as well.



Speaker: Hui Li, Los Alamos National Labs



Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/all-hands-deck-what-observations-theory-simulation-and-laboratory-experiments-are-teaching



Cost: Free



=================================



Friday, 11/01/19

09:30 AM - 04:00 PM



Stanford Linear Accelerator

2575 Sand Hill Rd

Menlo Park, CA 94025



Fun Science at SLAC Tour



Join us at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for a 90-minute unique and family friendly tour experience. The tour will begin with a short film, “Making Science Happen,” then visitors will get a peek inside the lab’s facilities. Hear about the ways in which SLAC is a leading force in scientific innovation, and see science at work! Suggested age to participate is 7 years and up.



Tours at 9:30, 11:00, 1:00 and 2:30. RSVP needed. See weblink for password.



Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/fun-science-at-slac-tour-2/



Cost: Free



=================================



Friday, 11/01/19

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM



Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)

Building 51

3rd Floor Conference room

Menlo Park, CA 94025



Two KIPAC Tea Talks



Benefits of sparsity in gravitational lens modeling



Speaker: Aymeric Galan



Lens monitoring and time-delay measurement for a precise determination of the Hubble constant



Speaker: Martin Millon, EPFL, Switzerland



Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/galan-benefits-sparsity-gravitational-lens-modeling-million-lens-monitoring-and-time-delay



Cost: Free



=================================



Friday, 11/01/19

04:00 PM - 06:30 PM



Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

1 Cyclotron Road

Berkeley, CA 94720



Public Tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

BASF Logo



Have you ever wondered what happens at a government research facility? Are you interested in high energy physics, harnessing light, or nanoparticles? Join us for a tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and learn about the Lab’s long history of bringing science solutions to the world. Spend the afternoon getting up close and personal with our Advanced Light Source, talk with scientists and engineers about sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere, and dive into discussions about innovations in nanotechnology. Attendees need to be older than 16 years old.



RSVP at weblink



Shuttle service will be provided for registered attendees from downtown Berkeley. No public parking at the venue.



Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/public-tour-at-lawrence-berkeley-national-laboratory-4/



Cost: Free



=================================



Friday, 11/01/19. 5:30 PM



International House

UC Berkeley

Chevron Auditorium

Berkeley, CA 94720



A Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student's Tale



This year's Emilio Segrè Lecture will be presented by Jocelyn Bell Burnell. In her presentation she will describe how pulsars were inadvertently discovered, describe some instances where they were 'nearly' discovered, and outline the properties of these amazing objects.



Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191101/2019-emilio-segre-lecture-featuring-jocelyn-bell-burnell



Cost: Free



=================================



Friday, 11/01/19

06:00 PM - 07:00 PM



Chabot Space and Science Center

10000 Skyline Blvd

Oakland, CA 94619



50 Years Since Our First Step: What Do We Know about the Moon?

BASF Logo



July 2019 was the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first steps on the surface of the Moon. In that time, the Apollo missions, a fleet of robotic probes, and observations from Earth have taught us a lot about Earth’s surprising satellite. In this non-technical talk, Andrew Fraknoi will look at the past, present, and future of the Moon, including its violent origins, the mystery of the frozen water we have found at its poles, and its long-term future as it moves further and further away from us.



Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ of San Francisco and San Francisco State Univ.



RSVP at weblink



Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/50-years-since-our-first-step-what-do-we-know-about-the-moon-2/



Cost: $5



=================================



Friday, 11/01/19. 7:00 PM



San Mateo Co. Asronomical Society

College of San Mateo Bldg 36

1700 W Hillsdale Rd

San Mateo, CA 94402



Probing Fundamental Physics with Strong Gravitational Lensing



In general relativity, the presence of matter can curve spacetime, and the path of a light ray will be deflected as a result. This process is called gravitational lensing, analogous to the deflection of light by (e.g. glass) lenses in optics.In rare and extreme cases, light can take different paths to the observer and more than one image of the source will appear.Strong gravitational lensing is lensing that is strong enough to produce these multiple images, arcs, or even Einstein rings. Many useful results for cosmology have come out of using this phenomena.Dr Birrer will shed more light on how astronomers are utilizing strong gravitational lensing to probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy, the dominant but yet unknown components of our Universe.



Speaker: Simon Birrir, Stanford KIPAC



Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html



Cost: Free



=================================



Fri, November 1, 7:15pm – 9:15pm



San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party

Houge Park

(3972 Twilight Dr

San Jose, CA 95124)



In Town Star Party



Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early t...



=================================



Fri. 11/01/2019 7PM



Telescope Makers Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center

10000 Skyline Boulevard

Oakland, CA 94619-2450



Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!



For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.



==================================



Fri. 11/01/2019 and Sat. 11/02/2019



Chabot Space and Science Center

10000 Skyline Boulevard

Oakland, CA 94619-2450

(510) 336-7300



EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing

Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!



Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.



12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)



==================================



Fri 11/01/2019 9PM



Foothill College

12345 El Monte Rd

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022



Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.



Admission is free. Parking is $3



Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.



Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!



==================================



Sat. 11/02/2019 10AM



Foothill College

12345 El Monte Rd

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022



Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.



Admission is free. Parking is $3



Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.



==================================



Saturday, 11/02/19

07:00 PM - 09:00 PM



College of San Mateo Bldg 36

1700 W Hillsdale Rd

San Mateo, CA 94402



Jazz under the Stars



Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM's very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.



This event is weather dependent. Latest weather updates.



Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp



Cost: Free



==================================



Monday, 11/04/19. 12:10 PM



Campbell Hall, Rm 131

UC Berkeley

Berkeley, CA 94720



Baryon Cycles in the Biggest Galaxies



Speaker: Mark Voit, MSU



Website: https://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/



Cost: Free



==================================



Monday, 11/04/19

07:30 PM - 09:00 PM



California Academy of Sciences

55 Music Concourse Dr.

San Francisco, CA 94118



Celebrating 20 years with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory



The launch of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in 1999 brought X-ray astronomy into the main stream, with 10 times the resolution and the ability to see objects 100 times fainter than previous x-ray satellites.



As Chandra celebrates its 20th year of operations, Dr. Wilkes will review some of the major discoveries and highlights of its scientific progress to date. This encompasses determining whether habitable exoplanets can survive the birth of their stars, to finding very distant supermassive black holes when the Universe was 10% of its current age, and everything in between: the birth and death of stars, merging galaxies and black holes, and unexpectedly chaotic clusters of galaxies.



What does the future hold for new Chandra scientific opportunities now and over the next decade, and what might follow Chandra when it ends its illustrious career?



Speaker: Belinda Wilkes, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics



Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/celebrating-20-years-with-nasas-chandra-x-ray-observatory-0



Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors



==================================



Thursday, 11/07/19

07:00 PM - 10:00 PM



City Star Parties - Point Lobos Parking Lot

El Camino Del Mar

San Francisco, CA 94121



San Francisco City Star Party: Lands End @ Point Lobos, San Francisco, CA



Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.

Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!



Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/



Cost: Free



==================================



Friday, 11/08/19

10:30 AM - 11:30 AM



Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)

Building 51

3rd Floor Conference room

Menlo Park, CA 94025



Two KIPAC Tea Talks



The Electromagnetic Counterparts of GW170817 and Future Gravitational Wave Events



Speaker: Kunal Mooley, NRAO and CalTech



TBD



Speaker: Meredith Powell, Stanford



Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/mooley-electromagnetic-counterparts-gw170817-and-future-gravitational-wave-events-powell-tbd



Cost: Free



==================================



Friday, 11/08/19. 7:30 PM



Peninsula Astronomical Society

Foothill College

Bldg. 5000, Room 5015 (our old venue)

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022



July 2019 Solar Eclipse Experience



Members of the Peninsula Astronomical Society will share their experiences at the July 2019 solar eclipse.



Website: http://pastro.org/dnn/



Cost: Free ($3 parking)



==================================



Fri. 11/08/2019 7PM



Telescope Makers Workshop

Chabot Space and Science Center

10000 Skyline Boulevard

Oakland, CA 94619-2450



Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!



For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.



==================================



Fri. 11/08/2019 and Sat. 11/09/2019



Chabot Space and Science Center

10000 Skyline Boulevard

Oakland, CA 94619-2450

(510) 336-7300



EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES

for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing

Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!



Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.



12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)



==================================



Fri 11/08/2019 9PM



Foothill College

12345 El Monte Rd

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022



Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.



Admission is free. Parking is $3



Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.



Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!



==================================



Sat. 11/09/2019 10AM



Foothill College

12345 El Monte Rd

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022



Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.



Admission is free. Parking is $3



Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.



==================================



Saturday, 11/09/19

09:00 AM - 03:00 PM



Foothill College Sunnyvale Center

1070 Innovation Way

Sunnyvale, CA 94089



Possible Self STEM Fair



A day of interactive, hands-on activities designed for 6th to 10th grade students and their families to Explore, Create, Make, and Learn about excitiing opportunities in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)



Website: https://stementorssv.org/possible-self-event/



Cost: Free



==================================



Saturday, 11/09/19

07:30 PM - 09:30 PM



San Jose Astronomical Association

Houge Park

3972 Twilight Drive

San Jose, CA 95124



Exploding Stars, Dark Energy, and the Runaway Universe



Some of the most energetic and fascinating objects in the Universe are exploding stars known as supernova. These colossal outbursts result from the deaths of stars and for a time can outshine the entire galaxy in which they're found. Elements necessary for life are built up in stars during their lifetimes and are spread throughout space during these supernova explosions. Observations of distant supernova provided the first evidence that the expansion of the Universe is speeding up with time, rather than slowing down. This wholly unexpected phenomenon is likely due to a repulsive "dark energy" and has become one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in modern science.



Speaker: Jeffery Silverman, Samba TV



Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/265779459/



Cost: Free



==================================



Monday, 11/11/19

06:45 AM - 10:00 AM



Foothill College Observatory

12345 El Monte Road

Building 2300, Hearthside Lounge

Los Altos Hills, CA 94022



Mercury Transit viewing from the Foothill Observatory



On Monday, November 11, the Foothill College Astronomy Department and the Peninsula Astronomical Society will be viewing the transit of Mercury. Join us at the Foothill Observatory (by parking lot 4) from sunrise at 6:44 a.m., when Mercury will already be in front of the sun, until the end of the transit just after 10 a.m.



Cost: Free ($3 parking)



==================================



Monday, 11/11/19

08:30 AM - 11:00 AM



San Jose Astronomical Association

Houge Park

3972 Twilight Drive

San Jose, CA 95124



Mercury Transit Across The Sun



Now here's something you don't see every day. In fact, you won't see it again until 2032!



This Monday morning, Mercury will temporarily move between the Earth and the Sun. This event is like a tiny solar eclipse, where Mercury will block part of the Sun from our perspective, and we will see Mercury move across the disk of the Sun over the course of a few hours.



Unfortunately, the transit starts before the Sun will rise, but from our vantage point in San Jose, we'll be able to watch the last third of it.



Do not look at the Sun with your naked eyes (!) but we'll have telescopes with special filters to make this spectacle safe to observe.



Along the way, we can also share with you a little about how the Sun works and how complex magnetic fields drive sunspots and prominences that we may get to see as well. And we'll probably have some donuts, coffee and tea to make it easier to bear this early-morning event.



Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/265944456/



Cost: Free



==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 



 

Monday, 10/21/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Breaking the law? A revised view of the relation between the sizes and masses of galaxies since z~3

Speaker: Lamiya Mowla, Yale

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/22/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

X-ray Impact on Planet Formation: an experimental view

In this talk, I will introduce how planets are formed in the disk of gas and dust surrounding young stars. Stars like classical T Tauri emit copious amounts of X-rays, in addition to ultraviolet photons, confirmed by Chandra/XMM observations of targets in the Taurus molecular cloud. Soft (<1 keV) and hard (>1 keV) stellar X-rays impinge and are absorbed by the protoplanetary disk during its million year lifetime. Yet, the effects of stellar X-rays on protoplanetary matter remain elusive due to a lack of fundamental X-ray photochemical data. Because X-rays are known to penetrate deeper in matter than UV photons or electrons this could have far-reaching consequences on protoplanetary dust.

To unveil the microphysical effects of X-rays on cosmic dust we tackle this problem using experimental astrophysics. We simulate cosmic dust in protoplanetary disks by using solid-state analogs, and simulate high doses of X-ray radiation using synchrotron radiation at large facilities. Dust nanoparticles are irradiated with X-rays until reaching astrophysically-relevant doses. The samples are examined via X-ray diffraction, infrared and isotopic microprobes. Our experiments show that large doses of X-rays significantly impact the structural, optical and isotopic properties of the smallest dust grains. I will provide an overview of what this means in the context of primordial planet formation and of our future work.

Speaker: Lisseth Gavilan-Marin, NASA Ames
Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/x-ray-impact-planet-formation-experimental-view

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/22/2019. 7 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Avenue
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Speaker: Professor Graeme Smith, Lick Obs
Topic: Globular clusters

Website: https://nightsky.jpl.nasa.gov/event-view.cfm?Event_ID=95252

==================================

Friday, 10/25/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks
Relativistic outflows in neutron star mergers
Speaker: Ore Gottlieb, Tel Aviv University

==========

CMB Lensing Tomography at 0<z

CMB lensing tomography has the potential to map the amplitude and growth of structure over cosmic time, provide some of the most stringent tests of gravity, and break important degeneracies between cosmological parameters. I use the unWISE photometric galaxy catalog to create three samples at median redshifts z~0.6, 1.1, and 1.5, and cross-correlate them with the most recent Planck CMB lensing maps. The resulting significance of 88 at 100 < ell < 1000 is the highest significance detection to date of CMB lensing cross-correlation. The redshift distribution of the two-band unWISE galaxies is a major source of systematic error. I primarily use cross-correlations with BOSS galaxies and quasars and eBOSS quasars to measure the redshift distribution, supplemented with cross-matching to deep COSMOS photometric redshifts. I demonstrate how to propagate the uncertainty in the redshift distribution to the modeling of the signal, and perform a number of null tests. Finally, I discuss the cosmological implications of this measurement and lessons learned for CMB lensing cross-correlations with future photometric surveys such as LSST.

Speaker: Alex Krolewski, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/gottlieb-relativistic-outflows-neutron-star-mergers-krolewski-cmb-lensing-tomography-0

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/25/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Early Dynamics of the Moon's Core
Speaker: Matija Ćuk, SETI Institute

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/fall-2019.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/25/19
04:00 PM - 06:00 PM

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Public Tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Have you ever wondered what happens at a government research facility? Are you interested in high energy physics, harnessing light, or nanoparticles? Join us for a tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and learn about the Lab’s long history of bringing science solutions to the world. Spend the afternoon getting up close and personal with our Advanced Light Source, talk with scientists and engineers about sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere, and dive into discussions about innovations in nanotechnology. Attendees need to be older than 16 years old.

RSVP at weblink

Shuttle service will be provided for registered attendees from downtown Berkeley.
No public parking at the venue.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/public-tour-at-lawrence-berkeley-national-laboratory-3/

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 10/25/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/25/2019 and Sat. 10/26/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing

Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/25/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.

Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/26/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
10:00 AM - 05:00 PM

GitHub
88 Colin P Kelly Junior St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Art + Tech Festival: Workshops

Space is a canvas on which we write our stories, paint our dreams, and build our realities. Space is a province of the known… and the unknown. Through art, as we architect space, we envision the future.

How do technologies like virtual reality allow new ways of living, being, playing, and moving in space? How might robotic prosthetics extend our bodies in space? How do radical mapping projects redefine our relationships to our world, and to each other?

Join CODAME at their ART+TECH FESTIVAL 2019『 S P ▴ C E 』 as they explore the many facets of space through workshops, nightlife installations and performances.

10:00-2:00pm: Workshops

• Make Art With AI
with Gary Boodhoo

• Data Visualization
with James Proctor

• Sound-Space Music
with Moldover

• Time bending media
with Virgil Widrich

2:00-5:00pm: Workshops


• Science Trough Story
with Sara ElShafie

• Analog + Digital 360 Sketching
with Michael Scherotter

• Immersive XR Journeys
with Jasmine Roberts

• Augmented Reality Art
with Sergiu Ardelean

See weblink for workshop details, costs, and registration. Use CODEAME-20 discount code for 20% off.

Website: http://codame.com/events/art-tech-festival-2019-space

Cost: $99 - $149 per workshop

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
10:00 AM - 02:00 PM

Cal State East Bay
25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard
Hayward, CA 94542

Discovery Day at Cal State East Bay

CSU East Bay, together with East Bay community groups, will be leading more than 50 hands-on activities, demonstrations, and talks. Experience a chemistry magic show, do some geophysical prospecting and fossil casting, touch sea slugs, bugs and other creatures, learn about your brain in the psychology playground, and so much more! Everyone - young and old - can experience the wonders of science. *** Event is held Rain or Shine!

Among the attractions will be:

• Chemistry Magic Show

• Statistics Funhouse

• Life of a Criminalist

• Computer Simulation

• Geophysical Prospecting

• Psychology Playground

• Fossil Casting

• Potpourri of Physics

• Observing the Sun with a Telescope

• Health Screenings

• Mathematical Puzzles

• Robot in Action

• Sea slugs, Bugs & other Creatures

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/east-bay-discovery-day-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
10:00 AM - 04:00 PM

Sonoma County Fairgrounds
1350 Bennett Valley Rd
Santa Rosa, CA 95404

North Bay Discovery Day

With more than 100 hands-on science, technology, engineering and math activities led by local museums, companies, schools and others, there is something for everyone at the North Bay Science Discovery Day. Discover what it’s like to be a heart surgeon using the newest life-saving technologies, explore the robot playground, go inside a helicopter, travel through watersheds using virtual reality, and so much more! *** Event is held Rain or Shine!

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/north-bay-discovery-day-3/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19

11:00 AM - 04:00 PM

Redwood City Public Library
1044 Middlefield Rd
Redwood City, CA 94061

STEAM at the Library

Come enjoy a day of STEAM at the Redwood City Public Library! With ten hands-on exhibits, both inside and in front of the library, families can explore Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math in an interactive environment. We are incredibly fortunate to have the talents of local experts to answer questions and demonstrate fun aspects of STEAM. The event is free and open to all Bay Area students, families, educators and friends.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/steam-at-the-library-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Genetics and Plant Biology Building
UC Berkeley
Room 100
Berkeley, CA 94720

Ask a Berkeley Scientist!

If the earth didn’t have an atmosphere, would we see the stars all day long? What is the difference between a CT scan and an MRI? If you could ask a scientist a question, what would it be…? Here’s your chance! Send your questions to Science at Cal at our website or bring them with you to this fun event, where UC Berkeley scientists from the fields of physics, biology, chemistry, astronomy, seismology and more will help find the answers!

Submit questions at the weblink in advance.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/ask-a-berkeley-scientist-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
06:00 PM - 11:00 PM

GitHub
88 Colin P Kelly Junior St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Art + Tech Festival: Closing Night

Space is a canvas on which we write our stories, paint our dreams, and build our realities. Space is a province of the known… and the unknown. Through art, as we architect space, we envision the future.

How do technologies like virtual reality allow new ways of living, being, playing, and moving in space? How might robotic prosthetics extend our bodies in space? How do radical mapping projects redefine our relationships to our world, and to each other?

Join CODAME at their ART+TECH FESTIVAL 2019『 S P ▴ C E 』 as they explore the many facets of space through workshops, nightlife installations and performances.

Website: http://codame.com/events/art-tech-festival-2019-space

Cost: $30 (20% off with CODEAME-20 discount code)

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
06:00 PM - 08:00 PM

Bluxome Center
61 Bluxome St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Who Can Become a Scientist?

Who can become a scientist? From media to textbooks, the answer too often is very narrow. This event will feature a collection of short films that tell the stories of how underrepresented scientists have succeeded because (and not in spite) of their identities, culture, and life experiences. Called “Background to Breakthrough”, these films expand the definition of who can become a scientist, and how. The screening will be followed by a Q&A and interactive discussion with the producers of the films. “Background to Breakthrough” is produced by Wonder Collaborative, a new initiative aiming to reinvent science filmmaking to capture the essence, complexity, and process of science to spark wonder. Wonder Collaborative is a project of iBiology, a UCSF-based non-profit organization with the mission to convey, in the form of free videos, the excitement of modern biology and the process by which scientific discoveries are made.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/who-can-become-a-scientist-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, October 26
Sunset: 6:19 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset.. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Sunday, 10/27/19
10:00 AM - 02:00 PM

GitHub
88 Colin P Kelly Junior St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Art + Tech Festival: Salon

Space is a canvas on which we write our stories, paint our dreams, and build our realities. Space is a province of the known… and the unknown. Through art, as we architect space, we envision the future.

How do technologies like virtual reality allow new ways of living, being, playing, and moving in space? How might robotic prosthetics extend our bodies in space? How do radical mapping projects redefine our relationships to our world, and to each other?

Join CODAME at their ART+TECH FESTIVAL 2019『 S P ▴ C E 』 as they explore the many facets of space through workshops, nightlife installations and performances.

Salon is a Community Gathering and Panel with Artists, Volunteers, and Partners

Website: http://codame.com/events/art-tech-festival-2019-space

Cost: $20 (20% off with CODEAME-20 discount code)

==================================

Sunday, 10/27/19
11:00 AM - 02:00 PM

Innovative Genomics Institute
2151 Berkeley Way
Berkeley, CA 94704

Be a Scientist: Explore DNA & CRISPR!

Come meet scientists at the Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI), a leading DNA editing research center! This all-ages, outdoor event offers a variety of hands-on activities, including building DNA models, virtual reality, lab coat dress-up, games, temporary tattoos, and more. Lab tours (for visitors 9 years and older) run every 20 minutes but have limited capacity and require in-person sign-up, long pants, and closed-toe shoes. IGI researchers will show you what it’s like to be a scientist and how CRISPR will change the world!

Register at weblink

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/be-a-scientist-explore-dna-crispr-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Sunday, 10/27/19
03:00 PM - 04:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

Full-Spectrum Science with Ron Hipschman: Science Fiction Turned Fact

Science fiction has predicted many things. Some have come true (think touch screens, submarines, bionic limbs), others, not so much - or at least, not yet. If you’ve ever wondered where your flying car or rocket belt is, or why you don’t yet have a robot servant, find out at Full-Spectrum Science.

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/full-spectrum-science-ron-hipschman-science-fiction-turned-fact-10-27-2019

Cost: Free with Admission

==================================

Monday, 10/28/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

What have we learnt about relativistic outflows from GW170817?
Speaker: Ore Gottlieb, Tel Aviv

Website: Click to VisiCost: Free

==================================

Monday, 10/28/19
07:00 PM - 09:30 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Nite East Bay: Barnacles, Chevron Richmond, Martian Atmosphere
Shaped By Chevron: How Oil, WWII and Migration Created Richmond

In an echo of the corporate towns of America’s past, learn why Chevron was built in Richmond or, more accurately, how Chevron built Richmond around the massive oil refinery. See how World War II and the second Great Migration bifurcated Richmond, and learn how Chevron Richmond’s control over city development and media amplified the division between Richmond and North Richmond and moved the center of Richmond city life from downtown to a 1970s mall overlooking the Bay.

Speaker: Mia Renauld

================

Resurrecting the Martian Atmosphere for Human Life

Mars is humanity’s most obvious and viable escape from a future inhospitable Earth, but the leap from our world to the Red Planet will require a nearly inconceivable amount of work on the Martian atmosphere. Learn why Mars was once warm and wet, with majestic flowing river and beautiful lakes, and what happened to make modern Mars so cold, dry, and incompatible with human life. Then hear about current projects that are preparing Mars for human colonization, why terraforming is crucial to the reformation of Mars’ atmosphere, and why human life on Mars will require digging a channel one billion times the size of the tunnel between England and France.

Speaker: Rob Lillis, UC Berkeley

===============

Using Fossil Barnacles to Track Ancient Whale Migration

Learn how fossil barnacles can be used to track the migration of prehistoric whales and answer questions about ancient and modern whale behavior. See how barnacles give us crucial insight into the morphological evolution of whales and how they can identify hot spots of productivity in the ancient oceans. Learn how fossils suggest Pleistocene Panama was once party central for ancient leviathans, discover how whales change behavior in response to changes in Earth’s climate, and see how modern barnacles accurately map whale migration.

Speaker: Larry Taylor, UC Berkeley

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/391516395118756/

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

==================================

Tuesday, 10/29/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Berti: TBD

Speaker: Angela Berti, UC San Diego

Electronics for precision cosmology: challenges in multiplexed readout of large detector arrays with the Simons Array CMB polarization experiment

Speaker: John Groh, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/berti-tbd-groh-electronics-precision-cosmology-challenges-multiplexed-readout-large-detector

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/29/19
04:30 PM - 05:30 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 200
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Tension between early and late universe measurements of H0: Hint of new physics?
Prof.Tommaso Treu of UC Los Angeles will give the Applied Physics/Physics colloquium

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/tension-between-early-and-late-universe-measurements-h0-hint-new-physics

Cost: Free

=================================

Friday, 11/01/19
09:30 AM - 04:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Fun Science at SLAC Tour

Join us at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for a 90-minute unique and family friendly tour experience. The tour will begin with a short film, “Making Science Happen,” then visitors will get a peek inside the lab’s facilities. Hear about the ways in which SLAC is a leading force in scientific innovation, and see science at work! Suggested age to participate is 7 years and up.

Tours at 9:30, 11:00, 1:00 and 2:30. RSVP needed. See weblink for password.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/fun-science-at-slac-tour-2/

Cost: Free

=================================

Friday, 11/01/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks
Benefits of sparsity in gravitational lens modeling

Speaker: Aymeric Galan


Lens monitoring and time-delay measurement for a precise determination of the Hubble constant

Speaker: Martin Millon, EPFL, Switzerland

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/galan-benefits-sparsity-gravitational-lens-modeling-million-lens-monitoring-and-time-delay

Cost: Free

=================================

Friday, 11/01/19
04:00 PM - 06:30 PM

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Public Tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
BASF Logo

Have you ever wondered what happens at a government research facility? Are you interested in high energy physics, harnessing light, or nanoparticles? Join us for a tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and learn about the Lab’s long history of bringing science solutions to the world. Spend the afternoon getting up close and personal with our Advanced Light Source, talk with scientists and engineers about sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere, and dive into discussions about innovations in nanotechnology. Attendees need to be older than 16 years old.

RSVP at weblink

Shuttle service will be provided for registered attendees from downtown Berkeley. No public parking at the venue.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/public-tour-at-lawrence-berkeley-national-laboratory-4/

Cost: Free

=================================

Friday, 11/01/19. 5:30 PM

International House
UC Berkeley
Chevron Auditorium
Berkeley, CA 94720

A Discovery of Pulsars: A Graduate Student's Tale

This year's Emilio Segrè Lecture will be presented by Jocelyn Bell Burnell. In her presentation she will describe how pulsars were inadvertently discovered, describe some instances where they were 'nearly' discovered, and outline the properties of these amazing objects.

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191101/2019-emilio-segre-lecture-featuring-jocelyn-bell-burnell

Cost: Free

=================================

Friday, 11/01/19
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

50 Years Since Our First Step: What Do We Know about the Moon?

BASF Logo

July 2019 was the 50th anniversary of humanity’s first steps on the surface of the Moon. In that time, the Apollo missions, a fleet of robotic probes, and observations from Earth have taught us a lot about Earth’s surprising satellite. In this non-technical talk, Andrew Fraknoi will look at the past, present, and future of the Moon, including its violent origins, the mystery of the frozen water we have found at its poles, and its long-term future as it moves further and further away from us.

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ of San Francisco and San Francisco State Univ.

RSVP at weblink

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/50-years-since-our-first-step-what-do-we-know-about-the-moon-2/

Cost: $5

=================================

Friday, 11/01/19. 7:00 PM

San Mateo Co. Asronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Probing Fundamental Physicswith Strong Gravitational Lensing

In general relativity, the presence of matter can curve spacetime, and the path of a light ray will be deflected as a result. This process is called gravitational lensing, analogous to the deflection of light by (e.g. glass) lenses in optics.In rare and extreme cases, light can take different paths to the observer and more than one image of the source will appear.Strong gravitational lensing is lensing that is strong enough to produce these multiple images, arcs, or even Einstein rings. Many useful results for cosmology have come out of using this phenomena.Dr Birrer will shed more light on how astronomers are utilizing strong gravitational lensing to probe the nature of dark matter and dark energy, the dominant but yet unknown components of our Universe.

Speaker: Simon Birrir, Stanford KIPAC

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

=================================

Fri. 11/01/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 11/01/2019 and Sat. 11/02/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIESbr>
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/

Free Telescope Viewing

Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm

CCome for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 11/01/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.br>
VViews of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 11/02/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 11/02/19
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM's very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

This event is weather dependent. Latest weather updates.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/observatory.asp

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 11/04/19
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Celebrating 20 years with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory

The launch of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in 1999 brought X-ray astronomy into the main stream, with 10 times the resolution and the ability to see objects 100 times fainter than previous x-ray satellites.

As Chandra celebrates its 20th year of operations, Dr. Wilkes will review some of the major discoveries and highlights of its scientific progress to date. This encompasses determining whether habitable exoplanets can survive the birth of their stars, to finding very distant supermassive black holes when the Universe was 10% of its current age, and everything in between: the birth and death of stars, merging galaxies and black holes, and unexpectedly chaotic clusters of galaxies.

What does the future hold for new Chandra scientific opportunities now and over the next decade, and what might follow Chandra when it ends its illustrious career?

Speaker: Belinda Wilkes, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/celebrating-20-years-with-nasas-chandra-x-ray-observatory-0

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 






Monday, 10/14/19
03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
Panofsky Auditorium
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Early days at SLAC - the quark discoveries

The first major experiments at SLAC were the electron proton scattering studies at End Station A in the late 60’s. The deep inelastic scattering yielded a complete surprise - the electrons were scattering off charged points in the proton. Follow up experiments showed the analogous behaviour for the neutron and determined charges and spin for the “partons” - they were the quarks of Gell-Mann and Zweig. A few years later, Charm was discovered at SPEAR, and the last doubters were convinced that quarks were real. This is the 50th anniversary of the first deep inelastic publications.

I will discuss early SLAC, these experiments, and some of the personalities as seen by a beginning physicist.

Speaker: Marty Breidenbach, SLAC

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/early-days-slac-the-quark-discoveries

==================================

Monday, 10/14/19
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics Program From revolutionizing the way we detect and visualize (nuclear) radiation to enhancing community resilience

Our Berkeley Applied Nuclear Physics Program aims at developing concepts and technologies to address outstanding questions ranging from fundamental physics to medicine and nuclear security and safety. Recent developments in radiation detection and imaging in combination with the enormous advances in computer vision and data processing enable unprecedented capabilities in the detection, mapping, and visualization of radiological and nuclear materials even in complex environments. We have developed a new concept called 3-D Scene Data Fusion that allows us to map scenes in three dimensions and to fuse them with nuclear radiation data in near real time while moving through these scenes. This concept provides new means to visualize radiation relevant not only for experts and operators but in the communication with the public. Results from measurements in the Fukushima Prefecture and Chernobyl will be shown to illustrate the power of the new concept. I will conclude with a brief discussion of our Berkeley Radwatch and DoseNet activities to engage with the next generation.
Speaker: Kai Vetter, UC Berkeley

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191014/the-berkeley-applied-nuclear-physics-program-from-revolutionizing-the

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/15/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks
I am data science and so can you!: My experience as a physicist in a technology start-up

Speaker: Sean McLaughlin, Stanford

The Polarization Behavior of Blazar Jets

Speaker: Lawrence Peirson, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/mclaughlin-i-am-data-science-and-so-can-you-my-experience-physicist-technology-start-peirson

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/15/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131

UC Berkeley

Berkeley, CA 94720

Cosmic Shear in the Year-3 DES data: 2-point and 3-point correlations

The cosmology analyzes of the Year-3 (Y3) data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) is at full speed ahead. Our preliminary weak lensing sample contains 120 million objects over 4200 square degrees of sky and is the largest shape catalog to date. This statistical power comes at a price: the cosmic shear measurements are more sensitive not only to the signal but also to potential systematics. In this talk, I will present our prospects for the 2-point cosmic shear cosmology analysis and some of the leading systematics that must be under control, in particular the Intrinsic Alignment of galaxies. Additionally, I will talk about a preliminary detection of a shear 3-point correlation in the DES-Y3 simulations and data which is unprecedented in weak lensing surveys.

Speaker: Lucas Secco, Penn

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 10/16/19 7:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Encounter with Ultima Thule: The Most Distant Object Humanity Has Ever Explored

After a successful encounter with Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft, for the first time flew by a member of the Kuiper Belt of icy objects beyond Neptune. This particular object, officially called 2014MU69, but informally named “Ultimate Thule” (meaning the farthest place beyond the known world,) turned out to be a “contact binary” - two smaller icy worlds stuck together. Such objects are left over from the time our solar system was first coming together and provides scientists with a glimpse of what it was like here before the Earth even formed. Dr. Moore will share an insider’s view (with great images) of how the mission got to its targets and what we learned while passing by Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Jeff Moore, NASA Ames

Website: https://foothill.edu/events/?sr=2&rec_id=6495

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Wednesday, 10/16/19 7:45 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks

Join Brian Day, of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, for a presentation on Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks. Learn about NASA’s Solar System Treks project that is producing a suite of online interactive visualization and analysis portals. There are now seven web portals in the program available to the public. This list includes portals for the Moon, Mars, Vesta, Ceres, Titan, and recently Mercury. All of these are unified under a new project home site with supporting content. In this talk, Day will discuss ways that students and members of the public can use these portals to conduct their own explorations of planetary surfaces, measuring diameters of craters, creating elevation profiles of peaks and valleys, and plotting traverse paths.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/17/19
05:00 PM - 06:45 PM

Cafe Scientifique Silicon Valley
HanaHaus
456 University Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301

A Sharper Image: Seeing Colliding Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

Adaptive Optics is a technology that detects and corrects changing distortions in optical systems. It has been applied to great effect during the past decade to correct astronomical telescopes for blurring due to turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere. This talk will describe how Adaptive Optics works, and how it is helping us to learn about colliding galaxies and their black holes, as well as outflows from the cores of nearby galaxy mergers.

Speaker: Claire Max, UC Santa Cruz

Website: http://www.cafescipa.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Exoplanet Spectroscopy

Speaker: Tom Greene, NASA Ames

=============

Prospecting for quadruply lensed quasars in the past decade and the next

Quadruply lensed quasars ("quads") are used to study several important astronomical problems, including the abundance of LIGO-mass primordial black holes. But quads are rare, with only one out of every 3000 quasars lensed into a quad. The alternative schemes used to identify them all have serious shortcomings of either an astrophysical or observational nature. The ground- and space-based surveys of the past decade have nonetheless yielded dozens of new quads. The surveys of the next decade will produce many hundreds. We discuss variouos different search techniques, some of which have until now proven productive and others of which are soon likely to be so.

Speaker: Paul Schechter, MIT

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/greene-exoplanet-spectroscopy-schechter-prospecting-quadruply-lensed-quasars-past-decade-and

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

The influence of melting and viscosity on the thermo-chemical evolution of Earth and other rocky planets

In this presentation I will firstly show results from numerical simulations of global mantle convection to explore the effects of melting on the thermo-chemical evolution of terrestrial bodies. I applied the models to investigate (i) how does melting-induced crustal production affects the interior state and surface behavior of an Earth-like planet, and (ii) the effects of intrusive versus extrusive magmatism on the surface tectonics and mantle cooling of a terrestrial planet. Results show that (i) melting-induced crustal production helps plate tectonics on Earth-like planets by strongly enhancing the mobility of the lid; (ii) high intrusion efficiencies (i.e. dominance of intrusion versus extrusion) lead to a new tectonic regime, named “plutonic-squishy lid” characterized by a set of strong plates separated by warm and weak regions generated by plutonism, and can cool the mantle more efficiently than volcanic eruptions for planets with no subduction in their history.
In the second part of the talk I will focus on the present-day structure and dynamics of the Earth. Seismic images of Earth’s mantle have revealed changes in mantle structure between 400-1000 km depth. The structures at these depths appear to be different in nature from the lowermost mantle or the lithosphere. I demonstrate that the changes in structure are driven primarily by the reduced rate of sinking of subducted oceanic plate material in the western Pacific basin. Next, I use numerical models of mantle convection to demonstrate that the observed structures can be best explained by a relatively large increase in mantle viscosity between the upper mantle and lower mantle at 660 km depth or perhaps somewhat deeper, near 1000 km.

Speaker: Diogo Lourenço, UC Davis

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/fall-2019.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19
01:00 PM - 10:00 PM

San Francisco State University
Ceasar Chavez Student Center
1600 Holloway Ave
San Francisco, CA 94132

ASP2019 - Earth to Space, Celebrating a Century of Astronomy

Join the Astonomical Society of the Pacific in celebrating their 130th anniversary with speakers and activities for all.

Planetarium Shows

3:40 PM, 6:30 PM, 8:45 PM, 9:30 PM. Lines begin 30 minutes prior outside the planetarium. Thornton Hall.

Portable Planetarium

2:00 - 2:30 PM, 3:30 - 4:30 PM, 6:00 - 7:00 PM. Student Services Center Grassy Knoll

Night Sky Viewing

8:00 - 10:00 PM. Thornton Hall

Astronomy on Tap

6:00 - 7:30 PM. The Depot in Student Services Center

Lectures and Panels

All speaker events are in Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center. Limited space, so come early.

Exploring the Moon: Past, Present, and Future 1:00 - 2:00 PM

Speaker: Kimberly Ennico Smith, NASA Ames

100 Earths 2:30 - 3:30 PM

Speakers: Debra Fischer, Yale University; John Brewer, San Francisco State

Astronomers for Planet Earth: Action for a Habitable World 4:30 - 5:45 PM

Panel: Debra Fischer, Yale University

Steve Richard, Climate Reality Project

Shawn Rosenmoss, San Francisco Dept of the Environment

Brandon Kline, San Francisco State Univ

Keynote Speaker: The Top Tourist Sites of the Solar System 7:30 - 8:30 PM

Using spectacular images from space probes and the world’s largest telescopes, Fraknoi will explore the most intriguing future “tourist destinations” among the planets and moons in our cosmic neighborhood. Stops will include the 4,000-mile lava channel on Venus, the towering Mount Olympus volcano on Mars (three times the height of Mount Everest), the awesome Verona Cliffs on the moon Miranda (which are the tallest “lover’s leap” in the solar system), and the recently discovered salt-water steam geysers on Saturn’s intriguing moon Enceladus (nicknamed “Cold Faithful.”)

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ. of San Francisco

See weblink for additional information, maps, parking info, and speaker bio's.

Website: https://astrosociety.org/get-involved/events/asp2019-earth-to-space/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Meteorites: Where do they come from and what are they made of?
Speaker: Bill Beiriger

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, October 18, 2019
7:30 PM to 9:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA
Near the tennis courts

Details
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 10/18/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/18/2019 and Sat. 10/19/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/18/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/19/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/19/19
09:00 AM - 04:00 PM

NASA Ames Research Center Airfield
Moffett Field, CA 94035

NASA’s SOFIA Open Day

NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will be open for viewing to registered guests on Saturday October 19, 2019. SOFIA is a Boeing 747SP jetliner modified to carry a 106-inch diameter telescope. Flying into the stratosphere at 38,000-45,000 feet puts SOFIA above 99 percent of Earth’s infrared-blocking atmosphere, allowing astronomers to study the solar system and beyond in ways that are not possible with ground-based telescopes. SOFIA is a joint project of NASA and the German Aerospace Center, DLR. NASA Ames is home to the SOFIA Science Center where onboard mission systems are developed, research flights are planned, and data from celestial observations are reduced, delivered to the scientific community and archived.

A limited number of free tickets for the event are available for reservation here. We anticipate the reservations will go quickly, so please reserve your tickets as soon as possible if you wish to attend. All guests must be U.S. citizens or permanent residents. No guests under 10 years of age will be admitted. The viewing of SOFIA, including wait time in line, may take as long as two hours, possibly more.

For information about the event, email arcevents@mail.nasa.gov

Website: https://nvite.jsc.nasa.gov/RSVP/?id=l7tz4

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/19/19
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Exploring the local universe with the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

Most galaxies are so far away that they appear to us only as faint smudges. However, for the nearest galaxies in our cosmic neighborhood, the clarity and sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope transforms them galaxies from smudges into spectacular collections of individual stars. These observations allow astronomers to study how galaxies form and evolve one star at a time. In this talk, I will highlight some of the amazing science and images produced by Hubble observations of local galaxies from the past three decades. The pinnacle of these studies is the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program, an 800 hour Hubble survey of our sibling galaxy Andromeda, and one of the largest Hubble programs ever conducted. I will describe the PHAT survey and its scientific impact. I will discuss plans for James Webb Space Telescope, which will succeed Hubble as the most sensitive telescope in existence following its launch in 2021.

Speaker: Dan Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/sac.html?event_ID=128633&date=2019-10-19&filter=Event%20Type&filtersel=

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/19/19
05:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
Buildings 51 and 53
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Community Day at KIPAC

The Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford is holding a Community Day open house. See weblink for details.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/community-day

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, October 19
Sunset: 6:28 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Saturday, 10/19/19 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Chabot Space & Science Center, 10000 Skyline Blvd
2nd Floor, Spees Bldg, Galileo Room
Oakland, CA 94619

Charon, Pluto’s Mysterious Moon

Pluto’s large moon Charon turned out to be far more interesting than scientists expected. Pluto was the star of the New Horizons show, but the features on Charon’s surface tell a fascinating tale of how icy worlds could form far from the gravitational influences of the giant planets. There is evidence of a world-wide sub-surface ocean early on, and of global expansion as that ocean froze solid. Charon’s surface also has a region of plains where icy materials may once have flowed and smoothed over the fractures present elsewhere on its surface. Dr. Ross Beyer will be your guide through this story of formation and change in the frozen reaches of the outer Solar System.

Speaker: Ross Beyer, SETI, NASA Ames

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/22/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

X-ray Impact on Planet Formation: an experimental view

In this talk, I will introduce how planets are formed in the disk of gas and dust surrounding young stars. Stars like classical T Tauri emit copious amounts of X-rays, in addition to ultraviolet photons, confirmed by Chandra/XMM observations of targets in the Taurus molecular cloud. Soft (<1 keV) and hard (>1 keV) stellar X-rays impinge and are absorbed by the protoplanetary disk during its million year lifetime. Yet, the effects of stellar X-rays on protoplanetary matter remain elusive due to a lack of fundamental X-ray photochemical data. Because X-rays are known to penetrate deeper in matter than UV photons or electrons this could have far-reaching consequences on protoplanetary dust.
To unveil the microphysical effects of X-rays on cosmic dust we tackle this problem using experimental astrophysics. We simulate cosmic dust in protoplanetary disks by using solid-state analogs, and simulate high doses of X-ray radiation using synchrotron radiation at large facilities. Dust nanoparticles are irradiated with X-rays until reaching astrophysically-relevant doses. The samples are examined via X-ray diffraction, infrared and isotopic microprobes. Our experiments show that large doses of X-rays significantly impact the structural, optical and isotopic properties of the smallest dust grains. I will provide an overview of what this means in the context of primordial planet formation and of our future work.

Speaker: Lisseth Gavilan-Marin, NASA Ames

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/x-ray-impact-planet-formation-experimental-view

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/25/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Relativistic outflows in neutron star mergers

Speaker: Ore Gottlieb, Tel Aviv University

==========

CMB Lensing Tomography at 0<z

CMB lensing tomography has the potential to map the amplitude and growth of structure over cosmic time, provide some of the most stringent tests of gravity, and break important degeneracies between cosmological parameters. I use the unWISE photometric galaxy catalog to create three samples at median redshifts z~0.6, 1.1, and 1.5, and cross-correlate them with the most recent Planck CMB lensing maps. The resulting significance of 88 at 100 < ell < 1000 is the highest significance detection to date of CMB lensing cross-correlation. The redshift distribution of the two-band unWISE galaxies is a major source of systematic error. I primarily use cross-correlations with BOSS galaxies and quasars and eBOSS quasars to measure the redshift distribution, supplemented with cross-matching to deep COSMOS photometric redshifts. I demonstrate how to propagate the uncertainty in the redshift distribution to the modeling of the signal, and perform a number of null tests. Finally, I discuss the cosmological implications of this measurement and lessons learned for CMB lensing cross-correlations with future photometric surveys such as LSST.

Speaker: Alex Krolewski, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/gottlieb-relativistic-outflows-neutron-star-mergers-krolewski-cmb-lensing-tomography-0

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/25/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Early Dynamics of the Moon's Core

Speaker: Matija Ćuk, SETI Institute

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/fall-2019.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/25/19
04:00 PM - 06:00 PM

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
1 Cyclotron Road
Berkeley, CA 94720

Public Tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Have you ever wondered what happens at a government research facility? Are you interested in high energy physics, harnessing light, or nanoparticles? Join us for a tour at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and learn about the Lab’s long history of bringing science solutions to the world. Spend the afternoon getting up close and personal with our Advanced Light Source, talk with scientists and engineers about sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere, and dive into discussions about innovations in nanotechnology. Attendees need to be older than 16 years old.

RSVP at weblink

Shuttle service will be provided for registered attendees from downtown Berkeley. No public parking at the venue.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/public-tour-at-lawrence-berkeley-national-laboratory-3/

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 10/25/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/25/2019 and Sat. 10/26/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/25/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/26/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
10:00 AM - 05:00 PM

GitHub
88 Colin P Kelly Junior St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Art + Tech Festival: Workshops

Space is a canvas on which we write our stories, paint our dreams, and build our realities. Space is a province of the known… and the unknown. Through art, as we architect space, we envision the future.

How do technologies like virtual reality allow new ways of living, being, playing, and moving in space? How might robotic prosthetics extend our bodies in space? How do radical mapping projects redefine our relationships to our world, and to each other?

Join CODAME at their ART+TECH FESTIVAL 2019『 S P ▴ C E 』 as they explore the many facets of space through workshops, nightlife installations and performances.

10:00-2:00pm: Workshops

• Make Art With AI
with Gary Boodhoo
• Data Visualization
with James Proctor
• Sound-Space Music
with Moldover
• Time bending media
with Virgil Widrich
2:00-5:00pm: Workshops

• Science Trough Story
with Sara ElShafie
• Analog + Digital 360 Sketching
with Michael Scherotter
• Immersive XR Journeys
with Jasmine Roberts
• Augmented Reality Art
with Sergiu Ardelean
See weblink for workshop details, costs, and registration. Use CODEAME-20 discount code for 20% off.

Website: http://codame.com/events/art-tech-festival-2019-space

Cost: $99 - $149 per workshop

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
10:00 AM - 02:00 PM

Cal State East Bay
25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard
Hayward, CA 94542

Discovery Day at Cal State East Bay

CSU East Bay, together with East Bay community groups, will be leading more than 50 hands-on activities, demonstrations, and talks. Experience a chemistry magic show, do some geophysical prospecting and fossil casting, touch sea slugs, bugs and other creatures, learn about your brain in the psychology playground, and so much more! Everyone - young and old - can experience the wonders of science. *** Event is held Rain or Shine!

Among the attractions will be:

• Chemistry Magic Show
• Statistics Funhouse
• Life of a Criminalist
• Computer Simulation
• Geophysical Prospecting
• Psychology Playground
• Fossil Casting
• Potpourri of Physics
• Observing the Sun with a Telescope
• Health Screenings
• Mathematical Puzzles
• Robot in Action
• Sea slugs, Bugs & other Creatures

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/east-bay-discovery-day-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
10:00 AM - 04:00 PM

Sonoma County Fairgrounds
1350 Bennett Valley Rd
Santa Rosa, CA 95404

North Bay Discovery Day

With more than 100 hands-on science, technology, engineering and math activities led by local museums, companies, schools and others, there is something for everyone at the North Bay Science Discovery Day. Discover what it’s like to be a heart surgeon using the newest life-saving technologies, explore the robot playground, go inside a helicopter, travel through watersheds using virtual reality, and so much more! *** Event is held Rain or Shine!

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/north-bay-discovery-day-3/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
11:00 AM - 04:00 PM

Redwood City Public Library
1044 Middlefield Rd
Redwood City, CA 94061

STEAM at the Library

Come enjoy a day of STEAM at the Redwood City Public Library! With ten hands-on exhibits, both inside and in front of the library, families can explore Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math in an interactive environment. We are incredibly fortunate to have the talents of local experts to answer questions and demonstrate fun aspects of STEAM. The event is free and open to all Bay Area students, families, educators and friends.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/steam-at-the-library-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
04:00 PM - 05:30 PM

Genetics and Plant Biology Building
UC Berkeley
Room 100
Berkeley, CA 94720

Ask a Berkeley Scientist!

If the earth didn’t have an atmosphere, would we see the stars all day long? What is the difference between a CT scan and an MRI? If you could ask a scientist a question, what would it be…? Here’s your chance! Send your questions to Science at Cal at our website or bring them with you to this fun event, where UC Berkeley scientists from the fields of physics, biology, chemistry, astronomy, seismology and more will help find the answers!

Submit questions at the weblink in advance.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/ask-a-berkeley-scientist-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
06:00 PM - 11:00 PM

GitHub
88 Colin P Kelly Junior St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Art + Tech Festival: Closing Night

Space is a canvas on which we write our stories, paint our dreams, and build our realities. Space is a province of the known… and the unknown. Through art, as we architect space, we envision the future.

How do technologies like virtual reality allow new ways of living, being, playing, and moving in space? How might robotic prosthetics extend our bodies in space? How do radical mapping projects redefine our relationships to our world, and to each other?

Join CODAME at their ART+TECH FESTIVAL 2019『 S P ▴ C E 』 as they explore the many facets of space through workshops, nightlife installations and performances.

Website: http://codame.com/events/art-tech-festival-2019-space

Cost: $30 (20% off with CODEAME-20 discount code)

==================================

Saturday, 10/26/19
06:00 PM - 08:00 PM

Bluxome Center
61 Bluxome St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Who Can Become a Scientist?

Who can become a scientist? From media to textbooks, the answer too often is very narrow. This event will feature a collection of short films that tell the stories of how underrepresented scientists have succeeded because (and not in spite) of their identities, culture, and life experiences. Called “Background to Breakthrough”, these films expand the definition of who can become a scientist, and how. The screening will be followed by a Q&A and interactive discussion with the producers of the films. “Background to Breakthrough” is produced by Wonder Collaborative, a new initiative aiming to reinvent science filmmaking to capture the essence, complexity, and process of science to spark wonder. Wonder Collaborative is a project of iBiology, a UCSF-based non-profit organization with the mission to convey, in the form of free videos, the excitement of modern biology and the process by which scientific discoveries are made.

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/who-can-become-a-scientist-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, October 26
Sunset: 6:19 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Sunday, 10/27/19
10:00 AM - 02:00 PM

GitHub
88 Colin P Kelly Junior St
San Francisco, CA 94107

Art + Tech Festival: Salon

Space is a canvas on which we write our stories, paint our dreams, and build our realities. Space is a province of the known… and the unknown. Through art, as we architect space, we envision the future.

How do technologies like virtual reality allow new ways of living, being, playing, and moving in space? How might robotic prosthetics extend our bodies in space? How do radical mapping projects redefine our relationships to our world, and to each other?

Join CODAME at their ART+TECH FESTIVAL 2019『 S P ▴ C E 』 as they explore the many facets of space through workshops, nightlife installations and performances.

Salon is a Community Gathering and Panel with Artists, Volunteers, and Partners

Website: http://codame.com/events/art-tech-festival-2019-space

Cost: $20 (20% off with CODEAME-20 discount code)

==================================

Sunday, 10/27/19
11:00 AM - 02:00 PM

Innovative Genomics Institute
2151 Berkeley Way
Berkeley, CA 94704

Be a Scientist: Explore DNA & CRISPR!

Come meet scientists at the Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI), a leading DNA editing research center! This all-ages, outdoor event offers a variety of hands-on activities, including building DNA models, virtual reality, lab coat dress-up, games, temporary tattoos, and more. Lab tours (for visitors 9 years and older) run every 20 minutes but have limited capacity and require in-person sign-up, long pants, and closed-toe shoes. IGI researchers will show you what it’s like to be a scientist and how CRISPR will change the world!

Register at weblink

Website: http://www.bayareasciencefestival.org/event/be-a-scientist-explore-dna-crispr-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 
 

 

Monday, 10/07/19
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Searching for Axion Dark Matter Below 1 micro-eV: the Dark Matter Radio

One of the most enduring mysteries in particle physics is the nature of the non-baryonic dark matter that makes up 85% of the matter in the universe. The QCD axion, originally proposed as a solution to the strong CP problem in QCD, is one of the most strongly motivated candidates for dark matter. We will describe the search for QCD axion dark matter with mass below ~1 micro-eV. I discuss fundamental limits on searches for QCD axion dark matter coupled to electromagnetism, subject to the Standard Quantum Limit, and the Dark Matter Radio, an optimized electromagnetic experiment to probe the QCD axion.

Speaker: Kent Irwin, Stanford

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20191007/searching-for-axion-dark-matter-below-1-micro-ev-the-dark-matter-radio

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 10/07/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Near Earth Asteroids, Space Missions, and the Impact Hazard

The near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are a population of objects on orbit around the Sun that cross or come near the orbit of Earth; remnants of material from the early solar system that never accreted into planets. NEAs are accessible targets for space missions, but also pose a hazard due to potential future impacts onto Earth. Dr. Busch will review the near-Earth population and efforts to address the asteroid impact hazard. He will also discuss past, current, and future missions to near-Earth asteroids, including missions by NASA, ESA, JAXA, the Chinese National Space Agency, and potentially other groups.

Speaker: Michael Busch, SETI

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/near-earth-asteroids-space-missions-and-the-impact-hazard

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 10/08/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305


Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Modelling Exoplanets
Speaker: Laura Schaefer, Stanford

TBA
Speaker: Aurel Schneider, Univ. of Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/schaefer-modelling-exoplanets-schneider-tbd

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/08/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Analytic covariance of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum
Speaker: Digvijay Wadekar, NYU

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/10/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

Cosmological Weak Lensing

Weak gravitational lensing is a unique technique to map the distribution of dark matter in the universe. It is also a sensitive probe of dark energy, large scale structures in the universe, and cosmological parameters. We will first briefly describe the principles of weak lensing. We will then review the current observational status of this field, highlighting several new measurements especially from the ongoing Dark Energy Survey (DES). We will then discuss the status of tensions between cosmological probes, and a new approach based on forward modelling and machine learning.

Speaker: Alexandre Refreger, ETH Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cosmological-weak-lensing

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/11/19 12:00 PM

Earth and Marine Sciences Building
UC Santa Cruz
Room A340
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Testing the Impact Hypothesis for Warming Early Mars

Speaker: Kathryn Steakley, NASA Ames

Website: https://eps.ucsc.edu/news-events/igpp-seminar/fall-2019.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/11/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Blue Galaxies: Exploring the Origin of Nebular Emission in the Early Universe

Speaker: Kirk Barrow

Spinning and Connecting (in) the Cosmic Spiderweb

Speaker: Mark Neyrinck, Univ. of the Basque Country

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/barrow-blue-galaxies-exploring-origin-nebular-emission-early-universe-neyrinck-spinning-and

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 10/11/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/11/2019 and Sat. 10/12/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/11/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/12/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/12/19
10:00 AM - 01:30 PM

Fromm Hall
University of San Francisco, FR 110
2497 Golden Gate Ave
San Francisco, CA 94118

As Above As Below: Cosmic and Brain - DARK MATTER COSMIC ORIGAM WORKSHOP
As Above As Below is an Astro/Neuro/Art exhibit that aims to cultivate and optimize dialogue between artistic and scientific inquiry through collaborative exchanges.

In this Origami Workshop, Mark will guide you in building the nearby galaxies, called "The Council of Giants", out of fabric and paper, and folding your own origami galaxies.

The exhibit runs: Oct 13 to Dec 15, 2019

Presented by: Mark Neyrinck, Astrophysicist

See our listing for the Opening Reception on Oct 13.

Website: https://www.asaboveasbelow.com

Cost: $10 suggested donation

==================================

Sunday, Oct. 13 12 PM-3 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association Swap Meet
Houge Park (3972 Twilight Dr, San Jose, CA 95124)

This very low-key, flea market-like event. You can make your underused astronomy gear available to the local astronomy community, and make a couple bucks while you're at it. If you are looking for gear, come by and see what's available.

The swap meet will be held from 12 noon until about 3pm, depending on how quickly things slow down.

Details are posted at the link below. http://www.sjaa.net/swap-meet/

And finally, remember that this is a service to the local astronomy community.

Donations of 10% of sales to the SJAA are suggested.

website: https://www.sjaa.net/events/swap-meet/


==================================

Monday, 10/14/19
03:30 PM - 04:30 PM

SLAC Colloquium Series
Panofsky Auditorium
2575 Sand Hill Road
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Early days at SLAC - the quark discoveries

The first major experiments at SLAC were the electron proton scattering studies at End Station A in the late 60’s. The deep inelastic scattering yielded a complete surprise - the electrons were scattering off charged points in the proton. Follow up experiments showed the analogous behaviour for the neutron and determined charges and spin for the “partons” - they were the quarks of Gell-Mann and Zweig. A few years later, Charm was discovered at SPEAR, and the last doubters were convinced that quarks were real. This is the 50th anniversary of the first deep inelastic publications.

I will discuss early SLAC, these experiments, and some of the personalities as seen by a beginning physicist.

Speaker: Marty Breidenbach, SLAC

Website: https://sites.slac.stanford.edu/colloquium/events/early-days-slac-the-quark-discoveries

==================================

Wednesday, 10/16/19 7:00 PM

Silicon Valley Astronomy Lecture Series
Foothill College
Smithwick Theater
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Encounter with Ultima Thule: The Most Distant Object Humanity Has Ever Explored

After a successful encounter with Pluto, the New Horizons spacecraft, for the first time flew by a member of the Kuiper Belt of icy objects beyond Neptune. This particular object, officially called 2014MU69, but informally named “Ultimate Thule” (meaning the farthest place beyond the known world,) turned out to be a “contact binary” - two smaller icy worlds stuck together. Such objects are left over from the time our solar system was first coming together and provides scientists with a glimpse of what it was like here before the Earth even formed. Dr. Moore will share an insider’s view (with great images) of how the mission got to its targets and what we learned while passing by Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Jeff Moore, NASA Ames

Website: https://foothill.edu/events/?sr=2&rec_id=6495

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Wednesday, 10/16/19 7:45 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks

Join Brian Day, of NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, for a presentation on Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks. Learn about NASA’s Solar System Treks project that is producing a suite of online interactive visualization and analysis portals. There are now seven web portals in the program available to the public. This list includes portals for the Moon, Mars, Vesta, Ceres, Titan, and recently Mercury. All of these are unified under a new project home site with supporting content. In this talk, Day will discuss ways that students and members of the public can use these portals to conduct their own explorations of planetary surfaces, measuring diameters of craters, creating elevation profiles of peaks and valleys, and plotting traverse paths.

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/17/19
05:00 PM - 06:45 PM

Cafe Scientifique Silicon Valley
HanaHaus
456 University Ave
Palo Alto, CA 94301

A Sharper Image: Seeing Colliding Galaxies with Adaptive Optics

Adaptive Optics is a technology that detects and corrects changing distortions in optical systems. It has been applied to great effect during the past decade to correct astronomical telescopes for blurring due to turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere. This talk will describe how Adaptive Optics works, and how it is helping us to learn about colliding galaxies and their black holes, as well as outflows from the cores of nearby galaxy mergers.

Speaker: Claire Max, UC Santa Cruz

Website: http://www.cafescipa.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Prospecting for quadruply lensed quasars in the past decade and the next

Quadruply lensed quasars ("quads") are used to study several important astronomical problems, including the abundance of LIGO-mass primordial black holes. But quads are rare, with only one out of every 3000 quasars lensed into a quad. The alternative schemes used to identify them all have serious shortcomings of either an astrophysical or observational nature. The ground- and space-based surveys of the past decade have nonetheless yielded dozens of new quads. The surveys of the next decade will produce many hundreds. We discuss variouos different search techniques, some of which have until now proven productive and others of which are soon likely to be so.

Speaker: Paul Schechter, MIT

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/prospecting-quadruply-lensed-quasars-past-decade-and-next

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19
01:00 PM - 10:00 PM

San Francisco State University
Ceasar Chavez Student Center
1600 Holloway Ave
San Francisco, CA 94132

ASP2019 - Earth to Space, Celebrating a Century of Astronomy

Join the Astonomical Society of the Pacific in celebrating their 130th anniversary with speakers and activities for all.

Planetarium Shows

3:40 PM, 6:30 PM, 8:45 PM, 9:30 PM. Lines begin 30 minutes prior outside the planetarium. Thornton Hall.

Portable Planetarium

2:00 - 2:30 PM, 3:30 - 4:30 PM, 6:00 - 7:00 PM. Student Services Center Grassy Knoll

Night Sky Viewing

8:00 - 10:00 PM. Thornton Hall

Astronomy on Tap

6:00 - 7:30 PM. The Depot in Student Services Center

Lectures and Panels

All speaker events are in Jack Adams Hall, Cesar Chavez Student Center. Limited space, so come early.

Exploring the Moon: Past, Present, and Future 1:00 - 2:00 PM

Speaker: Kimberly Ennico Smith, NASA Ames

100 Earths 2:30 - 3:30 PM

Speakers: Debra Fischer, Yale University; John Brewer, San Francisco State

Astronomers for Planet Earth: Action for a Habitable World 4:30 - 5:45 PM

Panel: Debra Fischer, Yale University

Steve Richard, Climate Reality Project

Shawn Rosenmoss, San Francisco Dept of the Environment

Brandon Kline, San Francisco State Univ

Keynote Speaker: The Top Tourist Sites of the Solar System 7:30 - 8:30 PM

Using spectacular images from space probes and the world’s largest telescopes, Fraknoi will explore the most intriguing future “tourist destinations” among the planets and moons in our cosmic neighborhood. Stops will include the 4,000-mile lava channel on Venus, the towering Mount Olympus volcano on Mars (three times the height of Mount Everest), the awesome Verona Cliffs on the moon Miranda (which are the tallest “lover’s leap” in the solar system), and the recently discovered salt-water steam geysers on Saturn’s intriguing moon Enceladus (nicknamed “Cold Faithful.”)

Speaker: Andrew Fraknoi, Univ. of San Francisco

See weblink for additional information, maps, parking info, and speaker bio's.

Website: https://astrosociety.org/get-involved/events/asp2019-earth-to-space/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/18/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Meteorites: Where do they come from and what are they made of?
Speaker: Bill Beiriger

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, October 18, 2019
7:30 PM to 9:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA
Near the tennis courts

Details
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 10/18/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

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Fri. 10/18/2019 and Sat. 10/19/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri 10/18/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 10/19/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 10/19/19
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Exploring the local universe with the Hubble and James Webb Space Telescopes

Most galaxies are so far away that they appear to us only as faint smudges. However, for the nearest galaxies in our cosmic neighborhood, the clarity and sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope transforms them galaxies from smudges into spectacular collections of individual stars. These observations allow astronomers to study how galaxies form and evolve one star at a time. In this talk, I will highlight some of the amazing science and images produced by Hubble observations of local galaxies from the past three decades. The pinnacle of these studies is the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) program, an 800 hour Hubble survey of our sibling galaxy Andromeda, and one of the largest Hubble programs ever conducted. I will describe the PHAT survey and its scientific impact. I will discuss plans for James Webb Space Telescope, which will succeed Hubble as the most sensitive telescope in existence following its launch in 2021.

Speaker: Dan Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/sac.html?event_ID=128633&date=2019-10-19&filter=Event%20Type&filtersel=

Cost: Free

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Saturday, 10/19/19
05:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator
Buildings 51 and 53
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Community Day at KIPAC

The Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at Stanford is holding a Community Day open house. See weblink for details.

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/community-day

Cost: Free

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Saturday, October 19
Sunset: 6:28 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

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Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies

 
 

 
 
 
 
 

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