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Peninsula Astronomical Society

Join us on our FaceBook page at: www.facebook.com/PeninsulaAstronomicalSociety

PAS March 2019 meeting is at a new location.


Subject: Looking for help to support Oct 5 Foothill Star Party

Hi Everyone,

Next Saturday, Oct 5, is both national Astronomy Day (the fall version)
and Int'l Observe the Moon Night,  so the PAS plans to host a star party
at Foothill Observatory in observance.
We are seeking volunteers to bring out their telescopes to setup outside
the Observatory to share with the public.
Given that sunset on Oct 5 is 6:47pm and civil twilight is at 7:13pm,
we are advertising a 7:00pm start time and will run until as late as 11:00pm
depending on the crowds.
Please consider helping PAS share the evening of Oct 5 with the public.
If you can participate, please email me at
(gj_baker at yahoo dot com) to let me know.

Thank you very much.

Gary
PAS President

PAS Invitation
     



Fremont Peak Obsevatory Association

FPOA Spring Newsletter .pdf, local copy.

FPOA Summer Newsletter .pdf, local copy.
 
 
        UCSC

Extra-solar Planet Search
http://www.oklo.org/
 
     
 
NASA Exploration Center  
 
   

Planets around other stars, extra-solar planets

TESS Exoplanet Mission

Kepler Mission

 
   

Planetary Geology
Design your own Lunar, Martian or Astrodial fly over
using actual data from Planetary probes.
(Parts of trek are still under beta test.)

https://trek.nasa.gov/
 
 

Gravity Wave Detectors

LIGO, Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory.
Links:
https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/detection-companion-papers

https://www.gw-openscience.org/start/

https://wiki.gw-astronomy.org/OpenLVEM/WebHome

Virgo in Italy http://www.virgo-gw.eu/
 
    
 Chabot Space and Science Center
 
 

Return to sept.htm


In the email

For more recent email go to oct-mail.htm 


In the email

Dear UC Astronomers,

On August 1st, the IEEE will dedicate a bronze plaque at Lick Observatory's Shane Telescope
honoring Lick's Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LURE).
LURE measured the distance to the moon using a retroreflector emplaced there by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

This is a very nice honor from the IEEE.
LURE joins the varied and notable ranks of other IEEE Milestone honorees.
Among these are the reception of the first transatlantic radio signals,
the first semiconductor integrated circuit, the first atomic clock, Moore's Law,
the first public demonstration of television, high temperature superconductivity,
and interactive video games. Quite a nice crowd to be associated with, if you ask me!

I want to call your attention to two nice press releases related to the event:

1) Lick Observatory commemorates Apollo 11 experiment on 50th anniversary describes the plaque
and the laser ranging technology used to measure the distance to the moon.

2) Apollo 11 anniversary: Lick Observatory scientists recall landmark experiment 40 years ago,
in which UC scientists who were present at the laser ranging event describe how the experiment
was rapidly put together for NASA, and what it has meant to them on a more personal level.

Best regards,
Claire Max  

More on this subject.


In the email

NASA video, how cooronagraphs are used to find extra solar Planets
https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/coronagraphvideo/


In the email

Synthetic Aperature Radar, on UTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MViVyocQhVw


In the email

Stanford Gravitationl Wave, lecture on UTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-i_ARhHfbpg 


In the email

email is listed with the most recent at the top.

 

 



Ken L's Bay Astro Event List,
Most recent at the top


For years, Kenneth Lum of EAS (and SMCAS ) has been compiling and distributing to EAS members a listing of upcoming events
pertinent to astronomy topics.
For some years now, I have been updating the AANC calendar page with that information,
but have not let the AANC contacts list know about it.
So the purpose of this message is to let you know about the update of the AANC calendar page.
https://sites.google.com/site/aancsite/calendar

-Alan Gould



 

Monday, 09/30/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Constraints on the Neutron Star Equation of State from Gravitational Wave Events
Speaker: Carolyn Raithel, Univ. of Arizona

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/01/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Direct Imaging of Habitable Exoplanets* (*In the Next Decade)

Direct detection and detailed characterization of habitable exoplanets is a key science goal of future observatories. Although space-based telescopes will characterize exo-Earths in the late 2030s, extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) on extremely large ground-based telescopes (ELTs) has the potential to enable such characterization in the next decade. However, if current state-of-the-art ExAO instruments are placed on ELTs, we would still be orders of magnitude less sensitive than what is needed to image a habitable exoplanet. With current telescopes we are also orders of magnitude away from imaging and characterizing the thermal emission from young exo-Jupiters and the reflected starlight from any exoplanets. Current ExAO instruments are unable to reach these deeper contrasts due to chromatic and temporal wavefront errors. I will first demonstrate the effect of these limitations using on-sky datasets taken with the Subaru Coronagraphic ExAO system. I will then illustrate a path forward: fast focal plane wavefront sensing of both quasi-static and atmospheric speckles. Our new method, called the Fast Atmospheric Self-coherent camera Technique (FAST), is designed to overcome these limitations. I will present the concept of FAST and show results from both numerical simulations and laboratory testing. These results illustrate that the improvement from FAST could enable direct imaging of gas giants in reflected light and young exo-Jupiters in thermal emission on current telescopes and, in the future, habitable exoplanets on ELTs.

Speaker: Ben Gerard, Univ. of Victoria

X-ray follow-up studies of highly energetic extragalactic explosions

Speaker: Dheeraj Pasham, MIT

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/gerard-direct-imaging-habitable-exoplanets-next-decade-pasham-x-ray-follow-studies-highly

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/01/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Learning from small scales in weak lensing and CMB data

Weak lensing of photons by large scale structure is sensitive to both the growth of the (lensing) structures and the expansion history of the universe. The large number of modes available on small scales have the potential to constrain cosmological parameters beyond what is achievable in the linear regime, but extracting this information from weak lensing surveys is not straightforward. I will review how to do so emphasizing the use of non-Gaussian observables and discuss how deep convolutional neural networks offer a viable alternative. The amount of information is limited by our ability to model the matter density field on small scales, including baryonic effects. I will end by explaining how future high resolution CMB experiments can inform simulations by measuring the angular momentum of baryons in the circumgalactic medium.

Speaker: Jose Manuel Zorrilla Matilla, Columbia

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/01/19
07:30 PM - 08:30 PM

SLAC Public Lecture Series
2575 Sand Hill Road
Bldg 53, Panofsky Auditorium
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Super-Human Operator: Controlling Accelerators with Machine Learning

Particle accelerators are used every day in a wide range of scientific, medical and industrial applications. But did you know that the task of operating these machines is far from mundane? For example, for every experiment at SLAC’s X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source, human operators regularly adjust several dozen variables to carefully shape the beam, bring it to the correct energy for that particular experiment and maintain stable operation. This is no small feat for a beam that has to travel about a mile and go through plenty of nonlinear “beam gymnastics” along the way! Accelerator researchers are starting to turn to machine learning to see if we can make it easier to create new types of challenging beam setups and to speed up routine tuning. In this public lecture, Auralee Edelen, will take you on a journey through accelerator tuning and discuss some of the ways accelerator researchers are starting to use machine learning to help out with this challenging task.


Website: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/public-lectures

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 10/02/19 7:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Seeing the Unseeable: Capturing an Image of a Black Hole

Black holes are cosmic objects that are so small and dense, that nothing, not even light can escape their gravitational pull. Until recently, no one had ever seen what a black hole actually looked like. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a global array of radio dishes, linked together by a network of atomic clocks, that form an Earth-sized virtual telescope that can resolve the nearest supermassive black holes. The EHT detects light that is emitted from gas that is close to the black hole event horizon, and this light travels unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. Einstein's theories predict that the EHT should see a ring of light and a dark region within that marks the point where light cannot escape. On April 10th, 2019, the EHT project reported success: we have imaged a black hole, and have seen the predicted ring of light that confirms General Relativity as the boundary of a black hole. This talk will cover how this was accomplished, details of the first results, as well as some future directions.

Speaker: Shepard Doeleman, Director, Event Horizon Telescope

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/36th-bunyan-lecture-sheperd-doeleman-seeing-unseeable-capturing-image-black-hole

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/03/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Varian Physics Building, Room 355
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Event Horizon Telescope: Imaging a Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array operating at the shortest possible wavelengths, which can resolve the event horizons of the nearest supermassive black holes. Observing at mm radio wavelengths enables detection of photons that originate from deep within the gravitational potential well of the black hole, and travel unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. The primary goal of the EHT is to resolve and image the predicted ring of emission formed by the photon orbit of a black hole and to eventually track dynamics of matter as it orbits close to the event horizon. A sustained program of improvements to VLBI instrumentation and the addition of new sites through an international collaborative effort led to Global observations in April 2017: the first campaign with the potential for horizon imaging. After 1.5 years of data reduction and analysis we report success: we have imaged a black hole. The resulting image is an irregular but clear bright ring, whose size and shape agree closely with the expected lensed photon orbit of a 6.5 billion solar mass black hole. This talk will cover the project and first results as well as some future directions.

Speaker: ShepDoeleman, Harvard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/event-horizon-telescope-imaging-black-hole

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/03/19 3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The inventory and history of CO2 and H2O on Mars - past, present, and future

Speaker: Bruce Jakosky, Colorado

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/03/19
07:00 PM - 09:30 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Gravitational Waves: Messengers from the Dark Universe
Speaker: Miguel Zumalacarregui, UC Berkeley

Stargazing follows the lecture from 8:00 - 9:30.

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/news/events/astro-night/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/04/19
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Future Friday's - Behind the Scenes Planning - To The Moon and Beyond

This month hear from SETI Senior Research Scientist, Margaret Race. Her lecture, Behind the Scenes Planning - To the Moon and Beyond, gives you an exclusive look into the important prep work that the public never sees before hitting the launchpad.
If you’ve ever been curious about the search for extraterrestrial life, Dr. Race’s work focuses on astrobiology, science policy issues associated with space exploration and emerging technologies. Get an insider’s peek at the future of space travel!

Admission includes First Friday event.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/future-friday-setis-margaret-race/

Cost: $5

==================================

Friday, October 4, 2019
7:45 PM to 9:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 10/04/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/04/2019 and Sat. 10/05/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/04/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/05/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
01:00 PM - 11:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Family Science & Astronomy Festival + Makerspace

Family Science and Astronomy Festival is a day of free learning and fun for the young and young at heart.

Featuring planetarium shows, science workshops, astronomical observations, public safety demos, and more.

The CSM Library Makerspace offers drop-in crafting, electronics, media and tinkering workshops.

The CSM Career and Workforce Hub will offer a Career Preparation Workshop featuring Oscar Garcia, CEO of Aspira and former LinkedIn Consultant.

The events culminate in a key note lecture by Brian Day, Lead for Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling at NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute

Contact:
Mohsen Janatpour
Email: Janatpour@smccd.edu
Phone: (650) 574-6272

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/familyscienceday/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19 7:00 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Illuminating Dark Matter

Dark matter is the cosmic parent of all vast structures in the night sky, including our own Milky Way galaxy. Yet, we know so little about this mysterious stuff that constitutes over 80% of the material universe. This talk will illuminate our universe’s elusive dark matter, highlighting the ingenious methods that scientists use to search for it.

Speaker: Robert McGehee, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
07:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Foothill College Observatory
12345 El Monte Road
Next to parking lot 4
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Observe the Moon Night

The Foothill College Astronomy Department and the Peninsula Astronomical Society would also like to invite you to join in on NASA's Observe the Moon Night at the Foothill College Observatory. The first quarter moon on Oct. 5 provides a prime opportunity to join people around the world in taking a closer look at our nearest neighbor.

Website: https://foothill.edu/events/?sr=2&rec_id=6496

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

First Friday: International Observe the Moon Night
International Observe the Moon Night is a worldwide celebration of lunar science and exploration held annually since 2010. One day each year, everyone on Earth is invited to observe and learn about the Moon together, and to celebrate the cultural and personal connections we all have with our nearest neighbor. Join us during our free public viewing hours as we observe the Moon through our telescopes! (Weather Permitting).

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/international-observe-the-moon-night/

Cost: Free

==================================

Sunday, 10/06/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

City Star Parties - Exploratorium
Pier 17
Green Street
San Francisco, CA 94111

City Star Party @ The ExplOratorium

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: Click to Visit

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 10/07/19 7:30 PM

California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Near Earth Asteroids, Space Missions, and the Impact Hazard

The near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) are a population of objects on orbit around the Sun that cross or come near the orbit of Earth; remnants of material from the early solar system that never accreted into planets. NEAs are accessible targets for space missions, but also pose a hazard due to potential future impacts onto Earth. Dr. Busch will review the near-Earth population and efforts to address the asteroid impact hazard. He will also discuss past, current, and future missions to near-Earth asteroids, including missions by NASA, ESA, JAXA, the Chinese National Space Agency, and potentially other groups.

Speaker: Michael Busch, SETI

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/near-earth-asteroids-space-missions-and-the-impact-hazard

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members & Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 10/08/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Modelling Exoplanets
Speaker: Laura Schaefer, Stanford

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/schaefer-modelling-exoplanets-schneider-tbd

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 10/08/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Analytic covariance of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum
Speaker: Digvijay Wadekar, NYU

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, October 11, 2019 12 PM

Earth & Marine Sciences Building., Room B214
UC S& anta Cruz
1156 High Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Speaker: Tanguy Bertrand, NASA Ames Research Center

Title: Pluto’s atmosphere dynamics and volatile transport investigated with numerical climate models

Abstract: Pluto’s tenuous atmosphere is mainly nitrogen and is in solid-gas equilibrium with the surface nitrogen ice. Over the past three decades, different Earth-based observations hinted at an exotic and dynamical atmosphere as they revealed (1) a much warmer atmosphere (70-100 K) than the surface (40 K), with a strong inversion in the first 20 km above the surface, (2) a threefold increase of surface pressure since 1988, and (3) global-scale oscillations in the vertical density and temperature profiles. In 2015, the observations made by the New Horizons spacecraft revealed the presence of magnificent haze layers, possibly due to gravity waves arising from N2 sublimation and orographic forcings. Surface-atmosphere interactions were also suggested by observed surface features, such as wind streaks and linear dunes, further highlighting the dynamical activity of Pluto’s surface and atmosphere.
New Horizons also revealed a complex distribution of the main volatile ices (N2, CH4, and CO), including the thousand-kilometers nitrogen ice-sheet in Sputnik Planitia, a combination of N2, CO and CH4 deposits at mid-latitudes, massive methane-rich deposits forming the Bladed Terrain at low latitudes, a methane mantle at high latitudes, CH4 snow-capped mountains near the equator, etc.
To understand all these observations, I have developed and used a hierarchy of models able to simulate Pluto’s climate and volatile transport over multiple timescales: (1) A Global Climate Model to represent the evolution of the 3D atmospheric circulation, the transport of gases and surface ices (N2, CH4 and CO) over up to several tens of Earth years (2) a 2D volatile transport model able to simulate the N2, CH4 and CO cycles over several tens of thousands of years (tuned using the GCM) and 3) A long-term Pluto evolution model combining the volatile transport model simulations with the variations of Pluto’s orbit and obliquity to simulate the evolution of the volatile reservoirs over up to 50 million Earth years. Such tools are based on universal equations, with the minimum of ad-hoc hypothesis.
At the seminar, I will review our knowledge of Pluto’s dynamics and volatile transport, and I will put forward what we have learned and what remains difficult to understand and predict with these models.

==================================

Fri. 10/11/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/11/2019 and Sat. 10/12/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/11/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/12/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/12/19
10:00 AM - 01:30 PM

Fromm Hall
University of San Francisco, FR 110
2497 Golden Gate Ave
San Francisco, CA 94118

As Above As Below: Cosmic and Brain - DARK MATTER COSMIC ORIGAM WORKSHOP
As Above As Below is an Astro/Neuro/Art exhibit that aims to cultivate and optimize dialogue between artistic and scientific inquiry through collaborative exchanges.

In this Origami Workshop, Mark will guide you in building the nearby galaxies, called "The Council of Giants", out of fabric and paper, and folding your own origami galaxies.

The exhibit runs: Oct 13 to Dec 15, 2019

Presented by: Mark Neyrinck, Astrophysicist

See our listing for the Opening Reception on Oct 13.

Website: https://www.asaboveasbelow.com

Cost: $10 suggested donation

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 





Monday, 09/23/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Tests of new physics with the Lyman-alpha forest

The Lyman-alpha forest (the correlated absorption seen in the spectra of high-redshift quasars) is a uniquely powerful probe of new physics in the cosmological model - whether that be properties of the neutrino, the nature of cosmic inflation or the phenomenology of dark matter. The challenge lies in robustly disentangling the cosmology and the astrophysics of the intergalactic medium from which it is sourced. I will discuss new models and methods that can achieve the statistical inference sufficiently accurate for current and upcoming spectroscopic surveys (e.g., eBOSS, DESI). These exploit the most sophisticated simulations of the Universe to-date and innovative machine-learning algorithms (Bayesian emulator optimisation). Deviation from the standard model of cold, collisionless dark matter would leave a characteristic suppression in the linear matter power spectrum that the Lyman-alpha forest can reveal. I will present preliminary bounds on the shape of this suppression and discuss the implications for the allowed range of dark matter candidates.

Speaker: Keir Rogers, Stockholm University

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/tests-new-physics-lyman-alpha-forest

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/23/19 12:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Particle physics beyond the Standard Model (and other fun) with clusters of galaxies

Clusters of galaxies provide superb laboratories for exploring new particle physics. They represent the most massive dark matter objects in the Universe, making them an important laboratory for probing dark matter decay and annihilation signatures. However, in this talk, I will highlight how the transparency (or lack thereof) of the magnetized intracluster medium (ICM) to X-rays can be a powerful probe of axion-sector physics. I will present new data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory for the Perseus cluster which already allows us to set constraints on the existence of low-mass axion-like particles which exceed those possible from the next-generation laboratory and ground-based searches. After discussing the future prospects and limitations of these studies, I will briefly discuss the other astrophysical implications of the new Chandra data for our understanding of AGN feedback and fuelling in Perseus.

Speaker: Christopher Reynolds, Cambridge

Website: http://tac.berkeley.edu/monday-tac-seminar/

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/24/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Tests of new physics with the Lyman-alpha forest

The Lyman-alpha forest (the correlated absorption seen in the spectra of high-redshift quasars) is a uniquely powerful probe of new physics in the cosmological model - whether that be properties of the neutrino, the nature of cosmic inflation or the phenomenology of dark matter. The challenge lies in robustly disentangling the cosmology and the astrophysics of the intergalactic medium from which it is sourced. I will discuss new models and methods that can achieve the statistical inference sufficiently accurate for current and upcoming spectroscopic surveys (e.g., eBOSS, DESI). These exploit the most sophisticated simulations of the Universe to-date and innovative machine-learning algorithms (Bayesian emulator optimisation). Deviation from the standard model of cold, collisionless dark matter would leave a characteristic suppression in the linear matter power spectrum that the Lyman-alpha forest can reveal. I will present preliminary bounds on the shape of this suppression and discuss the implications for the allowed range of dark matter candidates.

Speaker: Keir Rigers, Nordita

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/24/19
06:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Menlo Park Main Library
800 Alma St
Menlo Park, CA 94025

California's Changing Ecosystems: As Observed from Space

Learn the story of California's changing ecosystems--as observed from space--from USGS Research Physical Scientist Kristin Byrd, Ph.D.

• How can we use images from space to help us understand changes to our coasts, range lands, forests, and wildlife habitats?

• How can they help to predict future changes?

• What more can we learn from advances in earth observing technologies?

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/californias-changing-ecosystems-as-observed-from-space-tickets-71005616711?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/24/19
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum Community Room
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Looking Through the Gravitational Lens

Learn how astronomers are using gravitational lensing to aid in our understanding of the universe. Dr. Schaan will show how naturally-occurring gravitational lenses work and how they are used to take measurements across the universe. He also will discuss what we expect to learn from current and upcoming experiments with gravitational lensing.

Speaker: Emmanuel Schaan, Berkeley National Labs

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-looking-through-the-gravitational-lens-tickets-71878216681?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 09/25/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

Uproar Brewing Company
439 S. First St
San Jose, CA 95113

Astronomy on Tap: Saturn's Rings, Star Birth, and Exoplanets

Born with the Dinosaurs? The Origin, Age, and Remaining Lifetime of Saturn's Rings

Speaker: Paul Estrada, SETI

A Star is Born: How Stars Form in Space

Speaker: Jim Jackson, Stratospheric Observatory for Infrafred Astronomy

What do we Know About Exoplanets? And What's Left to Learn?

Speaker: Jesse Dotson, NASA Ames

Website: Click to Visit

Cost: Free

Website:https://www.facebook.com/events/865147153886196/

==================================

Thursday, 09/26/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
SLAC Fred Kavli Building (51) 3rd Fl Conference Room
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Menlo Park, CA 94305

Tip the Scales: Pushing the Limits of Computational Astrophysics

The role of computation in astrophysics has grown substantially over the last decade, driven by the growth in computer power, sophistication of computational methodologies, and increasing data volumes. Over the next decade, the importance of computational astrophysics will continue to grow as computers reach exascale performance and data-intense observational surveys like the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, Euclid, and WFIRST become available. I will present some recent efforts in computational astrophysics that push the limits of the world’s fastest supercomputers, especially by leveraging massively parallel hardware for numerical simulation. I will also show how the same hardware architectures are enabling new advances in astrophysical data analysis through deep learning. Together, numerical simulation and data analysis enabled by advanced computation will help us unlock some long standing mysteries throughout astrophysics.

Speaker: Brant Robertson, UC Santa Cruz

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/tip-scales-pushing-limits-computational-astrophysics

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/26/19 3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Ultraluminous X-ray Sources: Observing the Extremes of Accretion and the Search for Intermediate Mass Black Holes

Speaker: Fiona Harrison, Caltech

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/27/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Diffuse Galaxies As a Probe for Dark Matter

Low mass galaxies provide an essential testing ground for theoretical predictions of cosmology. They dominate the counts in the Local Group and have high mass-to-light ratios, making them ideal for studying dark matter on small scales. Recent advances in telescope instrumentation have opened a new window into the population of such low surface brightness galaxies. In this talk, I will present recent results from the Dragonfly Telescope, which has identified large numbers of low surface brightness galaxies beyond the Local Group and discuss its contribution and potential in extending our ability to test LCDM on small scales. I will discuss the recently identified population of ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) that holds the promise of new constraints on low mass galaxies dynamics, as their spatial extent and often significant globular cluster populations provide probes on spatial scales where dark matter should dominate the kinematics. I will also discuss the dynamics of two UDGs that seems to lack most, if not all, of their dark matter. I will finish by presenting our strategy for finding low surface brightness galaxies as part of the recently completed Dragonfly Wide Field Survey, covering 330 sq. deg., in the GAMA and Stripe 82 fields.

Speaker: Shany Dalieli, Yale

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/diffuse-galaxies-probe-dark-matter

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 and Sat. 09/28/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/28/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, September 28
Sunset: 6:59 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Tuesday, 10/01/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Direct Imaging of Habitable Exoplanets* (*In the Next Decade)

Direct detection and detailed characterization of habitable exoplanets is a key science goal of future observatories. Although space-based telescopes will characterize exo-Earths in the late 2030s, extreme adaptive optics (ExAO) on extremely large ground-based telescopes (ELTs) has the potential to enable such characterization in the next decade. However, if current state-of-the-art ExAO instruments are placed on ELTs, we would still be orders of magnitude less sensitive than what is needed to image a habitable exoplanet. With current telescopes we are also orders of magnitude away from imaging and characterizing the thermal emission from young exo-Jupiters and the reflected starlight from any exoplanets. Current ExAO instruments are unable to reach these deeper contrasts due to chromatic and temporal wavefront errors. I will first demonstrate the effect of these limitations using on-sky datasets taken with the Subaru Coronagraphic ExAO system. I will then illustrate a path forward: fast focal plane wavefront sensing of both quasi-static and atmospheric speckles. Our new method, called the Fast Atmospheric Self-coherent camera Technique (FAST), is designed to overcome these limitations. I will present the concept of FAST and show results from both numerical simulations and laboratory testing. These results illustrate that the improvement from FAST could enable direct imaging of gas giants in reflected light and young exo-Jupiters in thermal emission on current telescopes and, in the future, habitable exoplanets on ELTs.

Speaker: Ben Gerard, Univ. of Victoria

X-ray follow-up studies of highly energetic extragalactic explosions

Speaker: Dheeraj Pasham, MIT

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/gerard-direct-imaging-habitable-exoplanets-next-decade-pasham-x-ray-follow-studies-highly

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 10/02/19 7:00 PM

Hewlett Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall, Room 201
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Seeing the Unseeable: Capturing an Image of a Black Hole

Black holes are cosmic objects that are so small and dense, that nothing, not even light can escape their gravitational pull. Until recently, no one had ever seen what a black hole actually looked like. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a global array of radio dishes, linked together by a network of atomic clocks, that form an Earth-sized virtual telescope that can resolve the nearest supermassive black holes. The EHT detects light that is emitted from gas that is close to the black hole event horizon, and this light travels unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. Einstein's theories predict that the EHT should see a ring of light and a dark region within that marks the point where light cannot escape. On April 10th, 2019, the EHT project reported success: we have imaged a black hole, and have seen the predicted ring of light that confirms General Relativity as the boundary of a black hole. This talk will cover how this was accomplished, details of the first results, as well as some future directions.

Speaker: Shepard Doeleman, Director, Event Horizon Telescope

Website: https://physics.stanford.edu/events/36th-bunyan-lecture-sheperd-doeleman-seeing-unseeable-capturing-image-black-hole

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/03/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Varian Physics Building, Room 355
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

The Event Horizon Telescope: Imaging a Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) is a Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) array operating at the shortest possible wavelengths, which can resolve the event horizons of the nearest supermassive black holes. Observing at mm radio wavelengths enables detection of photons that originate from deep within the gravitational potential well of the black hole, and travel unimpeded to telescopes on the Earth. The primary goal of the EHT is to resolve and image the predicted ring of emission formed by the photon orbit of a black hole and to eventually track dynamics of matter as it orbits close to the event horizon. A sustained program of improvements to VLBI instrumentation and the addition of new sites through an international collaborative effort led to Global observations in April 2017: the first campaign with the potential for horizon imaging. After 1.5 years of data reduction and analysis we report success: we have imaged a black hole. The resulting image is an irregular but clear bright ring, whose size and shape agree closely with the expected lensed photon orbit of a 6.5 billion solar mass black hole. This talk will cover the project and first results as well as some future directions.

Speaker: ShepDoeleman, Harvard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/event-horizon-telescope-imaging-black-hole

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 10/03/19 3:45 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The inventory and history of CO2 and H2O on Mars - past, present, and future

Speaker: Bruce Jakosky, Colorado

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/i/astronomy-colloquium

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 10/04/19
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Future Friday's - Behind the Scenes Planning - To The Moon and Beyond

This month hear from SETI Senior Research Scientist, Margaret Race. Her lecture, Behind the Scenes Planning - To the Moon and Beyond, gives you an exclusive look into the important prep work that the public never sees before hitting the launchpad.
If you’ve ever been curious about the search for extraterrestrial life, Dr. Race’s work focuses on astrobiology, science policy issues associated with space exploration and emerging technologies. Get an insider’s peek at the future of space travel!

Admission includes First Friday event.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/future-friday-setis-margaret-race/

Cost: $5

==================================

Friday, October 4, 2019
7:45 PM to 9:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr.
San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 10/04/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 10/04/2019 and Sat. 10/05/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri 10/04/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 10/05/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
01:00 PM - 11:00 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Family Science & Astronomy Festival + Makerspace

Family Science and Astronomy Festival is a day of free learning and fun for the young and young at heart.

Featuring planetarium shows, science workshops, astronomical observations, public safety demos, and more.

The CSM Library Makerspace offers drop-in crafting, electronics, media and tinkering workshops.

The CSM Career and Workforce Hub will offer a Career Preparation Workshop featuring Oscar Garcia, CEO of Aspira and former LinkedIn Consultant.

The events culminate in a key note lecture by Brian Day, Lead for Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling at NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute

Contact:
Mohsen Janatpour
Email: Janatpour@smccd.edu

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/familyscienceday/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19 7:00 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Illuminating Dark Matter

Dark matter is the cosmic parent of all vast structures in the night sky, including our own Milky Way galaxy. Yet, we know so little about this mysterious stuff that constitutes over 80% of the material universe. This talk will illuminate our universe’s elusive dark matter, highlighting the ingenious methods that scientists use to search for it.

Speaker: Robert McGehee, UC Berkeley

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
07:00 PM - 10:00 PM

Foothill College Observatory
12345 El Monte Road
Next to parking lot 4
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Observe the Moon Night

The Foothill College Astronomy Department and the Peninsula Astronomical Society would also like to invite you to join in on NASA's Observe the Moon Night at the Foothill College Observatory. The first quarter moon on Oct. 5 provides a prime opportunity to join people around the world in taking a closer look at our nearest neighbor.

Website: https://foothill.edu/events/?sr=2&rec_id=6496

Cost: Free ($3 parking)

==================================

Saturday, 10/05/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

First Friday: International Observe the Moon Night
International Observe the Moon Night is a worldwide celebration of lunar science and exploration held annually since 2010. One day each year, everyone on Earth is invited to observe and learn about the Moon together, and to celebrate the cultural and personal connections we all have with our nearest neighbor. Join us during our free public viewing hours as we observe the Moon through our telescopes! (Weather Permitting).

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/international-observe-the-moon-night/

Cost: Free

==================================

Sunday, 10/06/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

City Star Parties - Exploratorium
Pier 17
Green Street
San Francisco, CA 94111

City Star Party @ The ExplOratorium

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: Click to Visit

Cost: Free

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 
 




Monday, 09/16/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

A 2020s Vision of CMB Lensing

The field of CMB lensing is somewhere akin to where measurements of the primary CMB itself were 15 years ago; we have detected it's there and measured some scales to moderate significance, but the exciting era of deep precision measurements is just on the horizon. Over the coming decade, CMB lensing (the distortion of the CMB photons by gravitational lensing due to the matter along the CMB photon's paths) will precisely probe the distribution of matter in the universe out to high red shifts. It will also allow us to remove lensing B-mode polarization, which will be crucial to potentially detecting primordial gravitational waves from the Big Bang. However, perhaps surprisingly given the important role CMB lensing will play, how to fully extract all of the lensing information from precision CMB data is an open question, as the lensing reconstruction is a difficult high-dimensional non-linear problem. In this talk, I'll provide a review of CMB lensing science aimed at non-experts. I'll also describe the methods we have been developing to perform this optimal extraction, which are rooted in Bayesian statistics, machine learning, and modern optimization and sampling algorithms.

Speaker: Marius Millea, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/2020s-vision-cmb-lensing

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

Alameda Free Library
1550 Oak St
Alameda, CA 94501

Wonderfest: The Most Famous Equation

Around the world, people recognize that E=mc^2 oozes cosmic insight. But what does this "most famous equation" really say? What are energy and mass? And what makes the speed of light, c, so important? [Hint: mass, moving at speed c, doesn't turn into energy!] Using little more than common experience and 9th-grade math, Einstein's "special relativity" gem can come to life with surprising insights into the nature of reality.

Speaker Tucker Hiatt, founding director of Wonderfest, has taught physics for a looong time. In 2006, he won the Amgen Award for Science Teaching Excellence, and, from 2008 to 2014, he was a Visiting Scholar in the Stanford Chemistry Department.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/the-most-famous-equation-2/

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Supersymmetry and Dark Matter: From the Weak Scale to the Planck Scale

While supersymmetry remains an interesting and important extension of the Standard Model of particle interactions, it experimental verification remains elusive. There are many motivations for supersymmetry, many of which center on the notion of Grand Unification. However, motivations for supersymmetry do not necessarily point to weak scale supersymmetry. I will review the prospects for weak scale supersymmetry concentrating on the opportunity for the discovery of supersymmetric dark matter. I will also look at the possibility of that the scale of supersymmetry is much higher (above the inflationary scale) and perhaps as high as the Planck scale.

Speaker: Keith Olive, University of Minnesota

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190916/supersymmetry-and-dark-matter-from-the-weak-scale-to-the-planck-scale

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

Morrison Hall Room 125
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Technosignatures: What Are They, And How Might We Find Them?: Jill Tarter at the Berkeley Forum

Arthur C. Clarke's third law states that "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." Since 1960, SETI (Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence) researchers have been searching for that ‘magic’ in the form of radio, and now optical, electromagnetic signals. These searches need to continue and grow utilizing the exponentially increasing capabilities of computing, but within the SETI field, we’ve always reserved the right to get smarter. In 2014, Karl Schroeder (Canadian futurist and science fiction author) suggested a variant of the Third Law; Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from Nature. What opportunities does this increased scope of the Third Law offer to our own 21 st century search for life beyond Earth? As we design and implement the next generations of ground and space based observatories, some of whose primary goals are the imaging of exoplanets and the spectroscopic analysis of their atmospheres, we should consider how we might distinguish between the byproducts of microbes and mathematicians. We are vigorously discussing/debating the right instruments to develop and fly to find biosignatures - how can we find the technosignatures of the mathematicians?

Speaker: Jill Tarter, SETI , emeritus

See weblink to register

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astrobiologist-and-astronomer-jill-tarter-at-the-berkeley-forum-tickets-71448304803?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/17/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Planning for JWST Observations

Speaker: Becky Canning, KIPAC

Astrophysics in the MeV gamma-ray band

Speaker: Regina Caputo, NASA Goddard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/canning-planning-jwst-observations-caputo-astrophysics-mev-gamma-ray-band

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/17/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The boundary of galaxy clusters and its implications on SFR quenching of satellite galaxies

Infalling particles form a sharp physical boundary around their first apocenters around the parent halo, which is called "splashback radius". The previous measurements of splashback radius using optical clusters reported a ~20% discrepancy against the theory prediction. Here, using galaxy clusters detected by SZ surveys (ACT, SPT), we present the detection of the splashback radius and its consistency with respect to N-body simulations, by cross-correlating the galaxy clusters to the DES galaxies. On the other hand, it is known that the infalling galaxies around galaxy clusters experience enhanced star formation quenching. Using galaxy samples split on their colors, we also present the possibility of constraining the quenching parameters in quenching models we adopt (e.g. quenching timescale), making use of N-body simulations.

Speaker: Tae-Hyeon Shin, Pennsylvania State

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 09/18/19 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exoplanets Across the Sky: the View from TESS

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA space mission that is tasked with tracking the brightness variations of stars across nearly the entire 360 degree expanse of the sky, in its two year planned mission. In operation for the past year, it has already made numerous new discoveries, including comets, supernovae, and exoplanets. TESS is finding small, rocky planets around stars that are bright enough to view with binoculars, or even the naked eye. These are prime targets for future studies of exoplanetary composition and atmospheres. In this talk I will present some of the many TESS discoveries to date and discuss ongoing efforts to conduct follow-up studies from the ground.

Speaker: Ann Marie Cody, NASA Ames and SETI

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/20/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

The boundary of galaxy clusters and its implications on SFR quenching of satellite galaxies

Speaker: Tae Hyeon-Shin, Univ. of Pennsylvania

Machine learning applied to Cosmology

Speaker: Tomasz Kacprzak, ETH Zurich

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/hyeon-shin-boundary-galaxy-clusters-and-its-implications-sfr-quenching-satellite-galaxies

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, September 20, 2019 7:00 p.m.
Show & Tell starts at 7:30 pm

Tri-Valley Stargazers
Unitarian Universalist Church
1893 N. Vasco Rd.,
Livermore, CA

Spacecraft Thermal Control

In this presentation we will discuss the role of Thermal Engineers on the spacecraft design team and explore the use of conduction and thermal radiation (the two dominant modes of heat transfer in a vacuum) to control the temperature of the spacecraft.

Speaker: Kenji Ozawa

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

==================================

Friday, September 20, 2019
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 and Sat. 09/21/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/21/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 09/21/19
10:00 AM - 05:00 PM

Hiller Aviation Museum
601 Skyway Rd.
San Carlos, CA 94070

Smithsonian Museum Day Live

Smithsonian Museum Day Live! is an annual event hosted by Smithsonian magazine. On Saturday, September 21, 2019, visitors who present the Museum Day Live! ticket at the Hiller Aviation Museum will gain free museum admission for two.

Tickets available at weblink starting Aug 15.

Website: https://www.hiller.org/event/smithsonian-museum-day/

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, September 21, 2019 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Galileo Room
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Join us for dinner with the speaker beforehand at 5:30 PM at Hunan Yuan Restaurant!
4100 Redwood Road, #11

Origin of the Elements: A Story of Stellar Nucleosynthesis
by Molly Wakeling, UC Berkeley

ABOUT THE TALK:
Where do we come from? A fundamental question of the human species. We might not know the answer, but we do know how the atoms that make up us, the sun, the planets, and the stars were made. Many schoolchildren know that the sun is a star made of hydrogen and helium gas – much like the early universe. But where did that original hydrogen and helium come from? And what about the rest of the periodic table of elements?

The story of our chemical makeup is the story of nucleosynthesis. Big Bang nucleosynthesis generated the seeds of hydrogen and helium within the first 20 minutes of the universe’s existence. Long after that, the first stars formed, where a process slightly more complicated than you might think produces some of the heavier elements. Stars can only produce atoms up to iron, however – the rest require far more energetic processes.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Saturday, 09/21/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Movie Night on Mt. Tam: The Martian

2015 film starring Matt Damon depicts the struggles of an astronaut left behind on Mars as he awaits rescue. Post-screening discussion by Jeffrey Silverman of Science VS Cinema

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, September 21
Sunset: 7:09 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Tuesday, 09/24/19
06:30 PM - 07:30 PM

Menlo Park Main Library
800 Alma St
Menlo Park, CA 94025

California's Changing Ecosystems: As Observed from Space

Learn the story of California's changing ecosystems--as observed from space--from USGS Research Physical Scientist Kristin Byrd, Ph.D.

• How can we use images from space to help us understand changes to our coasts, range lands, forests, and wildlife habitats?

• How can they help to predict future changes?

• What more can we learn from advances in earth observing technologies?

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/californias-changing-ecosystems-as-observed-from-space-tickets-71005616711?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/24/19
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Mount Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Museum Community Room
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Looking Through the Gravitational Lens

Learn how astronomers are using gravitational lensing to aid in our understanding of the universe. Dr. Schaan will show how naturally-occurring gravitational lenses work and how they are used to take measurements across the universe. He also will discuss what we expect to learn from current and upcoming experiments with gravitational lensing.

Speaker: Emmanuel Schaan, Berkeley National Labs

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-looking-through-the-gravitational-lens-tickets-71878216681?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 09/25/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

Uproar Brewing Company
439 S. First St
San Jose, CA 95113

Astronomy on Tap: Born with the Dinosaurs? The Origin, Age, and Remaining Lifetime of Saturn's Rings

Speaker: Paul Estrada, SETI

Other speakers TBA

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/865147153886196/

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 and Sat. 09/28/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/27/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/28/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, September 28
Sunset: 6:59 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 




Monday, 09/09/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Why Do Dark Matter Haloes Die Together? The Causes of Halo Assembly Bias at Galaxy Masses

At a constant mass, old dark matter haloes and young dark matter haloes cluster differently from one another. This fact, known as "assembly bias," severely complicates the construction of mock catalogues and serves as a major challenge for structure formation models. In this talk, I test and synthesize the many competing explanations for this phenomenon into a single cohesive story with a strong focus on low mass haloes.

Speaker: Philip Mansfield, Univ. of Chicago

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/why-do-dark-matter-haloes-die-together-causes-halo-assembly-bias-galaxy-masses

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/09/19
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture Series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Mapping the Universe: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, and investigate the origin of planets. SDSS will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art.

Speaker: Juna Kollmeier, Carnegie Institution for Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/mapping-the-universe-the-sloan-digital-sky-survey

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 09/10/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Why Do Dark Matter Haloes Die Together? The Causes of Halo Assembly Bias at Galaxy Masses

At a constant mass, old dark matter haloes and young dark matter haloes cluster differently from one another. This fact, known as "assembly bias," severely complicates the construction of mock catalogues and serves as a major challenge for structure formation models. In this talk, I test and synthesize the many competing explanations for this phenomenon into a single cohesive story with a strong focus on low mass haloes.
Speaker: Phil Mansfield, Chicago

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/10/19
07:00 PM - 08:00 PM

SETI Institute: SETI Talks
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Ave
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Nobel Prize: Blessing or Curse?

Scientists can spend theirentire career on a single idea, or elaborate experiment, and never find anything new. But if they make a significant breakthrough and discover what they have been looking for, they can win the ultimate prize: the Nobel Prize.

Is the Nobel Prize, and any other high-profile recognition, a valid indicator of being an excellent scientist? In their ambition to pursue the Nobel gold, are scientists deceived by galactic mirages? Does the Nobel Prize hamper scientific progress by encouraging speed and competition while punishing inclusivity, collaboration, and innovation?

To discuss these provocative ideas, we invited two astronomers whose life and career have been closely connected with the Nobel Prize. Brian Keating, Distinguished Professor of Physics at the University of California, San Diego, was a member of the BICEP2, a cosmology telescope that was thought to have witnessed the Big Bang in 2014. In his book, “Losing the Nobel Prize,” Brian tells the inside story of the BICEP2's detection and the ensuing scientific drama. Alex Filippenko, Professor of Astronomy at the University of California, Berkeley, was the only person to have been a member of both teams that revealed the accelerating expansion of the Universe. This groundbreaking discovery led to the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for the teams’ leaders.

The scientists will describe their experiences in the fast-paced field of cosmology and whether the idea that their research could lead to a Nobel Prize influenced their work. They’ll also share their thoughts on the pursuit of fame and the question of ethics in modern science.

Panel: Alex Filippenko, UC Berkeley; Brian Keating, UC San Diego, moderated by Seth Shostak, SETI

Website: https://seti.org/event/nobel-prize-blessing-or-curse

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/13/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Observations and modelling of gamma-ray flares in blazars

Speaker: Manuel Meyer

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/observations-and-modelling-gamma-ray-flares-blazars

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/13/19
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Bookshop West Portal
80 W Portal Ave
San Francisco, CA 94127

Wonderfest: Quantum Worlds

Quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in science. (Bear in mind: theory is as good as it gets in science!) Still, physicists themselves admit that they don't fully understand the quantum world. Caltech physicist and New York Times best-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way to understand the mysteries of the quantum world ... of quantum worlds.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/quantum-worlds/

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt  eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 and Sat. 09/14/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/13/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/14/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 09/14/19
01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Sean Carroll: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Space-Time

Quantum mechanics is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in physics, yet physicists themselves readily admit that they don't understand it. But Caltech physicist and New York Timesbest-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way of understanding the mysteries of the quantum world.

This event was rescheduled from July 16.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sean-carroll-quantum-worlds-and-the-emergence-of-space-time-tickets-63771484226?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: $22 General, $15 Member, $8 Student

==================================

Saturday, 09/14/19 7:30pm-Note change in time

Peninsual Astronomical Society
Los Altos Public Library
13 S. San Antonio Rd.
Los Altos, CA

"Getting the Astronomy Right in a Novel”

NORM SPERLING

Website: http://www.pastro.org/dnn/

==================================

Saturday, 09/14/19 8:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Exploring Pluto, Charon & the outer reaches of the solar system

In 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft flew past icy Pluto and Charon and sent back the first images of these objects in the furthest outskirts of our solar system. I will review what we now know about Pluto and Charon, and how the study of these bodies has evolved. I'll also discuss the images received over the New Year from the much smaller icy object Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Francis Nimmo

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/264143602/

Cost: Free

==================================

Sunday, 09/15/19
04:30 PM - 09:00 PM

USS Hornet
707 W Hornet Ave
Alameda, CA 94501

AIAA-SF Annual Banquet celebrating 50th anniversary of Apollo 11

This year, we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 by hosting our annual banquet on the USS Hornet, the aircraft carrier that picked up the crew of Apollo 11 from the Pacific Ocean. During this event, we will have a buffet style dinner in the ship’s officers wardroom, a talk about the Apollo 11 Earth Landing System given by Anthony Smith, an engineer who was directly involved in its development, an awards session, and finally there will be a special Apollo 11 themed guided tour aboard the ship, including a special exhibit on the same theme.

This talk will consist of two main parts. The first part focuses on the pre-Apollo history, and gives a 10-year timespan overview of several milestones of the space program up to, and including, Apollo 11. The second part elaborates on the personal experiences of the speaker by means of a pre-recorded interview which was made for the Hornet Museum Archives. There will be an opportunity for Q&A at the end of the presentation.

Space is limited and prices go up after 9/8.

Website: https://aiaa-sf.org/event/aiaa-banquet-2019/

Cost: $19.00 - $49.00

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

A 2020s Vision of CMB Lensing

The field of CMB lensing is somewhere akin to where measurements of the primary CMB itself were 15 years ago; we have detected it's there and measured some scales to moderate significance, but the exciting era of deep precision measurements is just on the horizon. Over the coming decade, CMB lensing (the distortion of the CMB photons by gravitational lensing due to the matter along the CMB photon's paths) will precisely probe the distribution of matter in the universe out to high red shifts. It will also allow us to remove lensing B-mode polarization, which will be crucial to potentially detecting primordial gravitational waves from the Big Bang. However, perhaps surprisingly given the important role CMB lensing will play, how to fully extract all of the lensing information from precision CMB data is an open question, as the lensing reconstruction is a difficult high-dimensional non-linear problem. In this talk, I'll provide a review of CMB lensing science aimed at non-experts. I'll also describe the methods we have been developing to perform this optimal extraction, which are rooted in Bayesian statistics, machine learning, and modern optimization and sampling algorithms.

Speaker: Marius Millea, UC Berkeley

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/2020s-vision-cmb-lensing

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
04:15 PM - 05:15 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Supersymmetry and Dark Matter: From the Weak Scale to the Planck Scale

While supersymmetry remains an interesting and important extension of the Standard Model of particle interactions, it experimental verification remains elusive. There are many motivations for supersymmetry, many of which center on the notion of Grand Unification. However, motivations for supersymmetry do not necessarily point to weak scale supersymmetry. I will review the prospects for weak scale supersymmetry concentrating on the opportunity for the discovery of supersymmetric dark matter. I will also look at the possibility of that the scale of supersymmetry is much higher (above the inflationary scale) and perhaps as high as the Planck scale.

Speaker: Keith Olive, University of Minnesota

Website: https://physics.berkeley.edu/news-events/events/20190916/supersymmetry-and-dark-matter-from-the-weak-scale-to-the-planck-scale

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/16/19
06:00 PM - 07:00 PM

TBA
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Technosignatures: What Are They, And How Might We Find Them?: Jill Tarter at the Berkeley Forum

Arthur C. Clarke's third law states that "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." Since 1960, SETI (Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence) researchers have been searching for that ‘magic’ in the form of radio, and now optical, electromagnetic signals. These searches need to continue and grow utilizing the exponentially increasing capabilities of computing, but within the SETI field, we’ve always reserved the right to get smarter. In 2014, Karl Schroeder (Canadian futurist and science fiction author) suggested a variant of the Third Law; Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from Nature. What opportunities does this increased scope of the Third Law offer to our own 21 st century search for life beyond Earth? As we design and implement the next generations of ground and space based observatories, some of whose primary goals are the imaging of exoplanets and the spectroscopic analysis of their atmospheres, we should consider how we might distinguish between the byproducts of microbes and mathematicians. We are vigorously discussing/debating the right instruments to develop and fly to find biosignatures - how can we find the technosignatures of the mathematicians?

Speaker: Jill Tarter, SETI , emeritus

See weblink to register

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astrobiologist-and-astronomer-jill-tarter-at-the-berkeley-forum-tickets-71448304803?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 09/17/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Two KIPAC Tea Talks

Planning for JWST Observations

Speaker: Becky Canning, KIPAC

TBA

Speaker: Regina Caputo, NASA Goddard

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/canning-planning-jwst-observations-caputo-tbd

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 09/18/19 7:30 PM

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum
199 Museum Way
San Francisco, CA 94114

Exoplanets Across the Sky: the View from TESS

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA space mission that is tasked with tracking the brightness variations of stars across nearly the entire 360 degree expanse of the sky, in its two year planned mission. In operation for the past year, it has already made numerous new discoveries, including comets, supernovae, and exoplanets. TESS is finding small, rocky planets around stars that are bright enough to view with binoculars, or even the naked eye. These are prime targets for future studies of exoplanetary composition and atmospheres. In this talk I will present some of the many TESS discoveries to date and discuss ongoing efforts to conduct follow-up studies from the ground.

Speaker: Ann Marie Cody, NASA Ames and SETI

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, September 20, 2019 7:00 p.m.
Show & Tell starts at 7:30 pm

Tri-Valley Stargazers
Unitarian Universalist Church
1893 N. Vasco Rd.,
Livermore, CA

Speaker: Kenji Ozawa

Spacecraft Thermal Control

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

==================================

Friday, September 20, 2019
8:00 PM to 10:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 and Sat. 09/21/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/20/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/21/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, September 21, 2019 7:30 PM

East Bay Astronomical Society
Galileo Room
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Join us for dinner with the speaker beforehand at 5:30 PM at Hunan Yuan Restaurant!
4100 Redwood Road, #11

Origin of the Elements: A Story of Stellar Nucleosynthesis
by Molly Wakeling, UC Berkeley

ABOUT THE TALK:
Where do we come from? A fundamental question of the human species. We might not know the answer, but we do know how the atoms that make up us, the sun, the planets, and the stars were made. Many schoolchildren know that the sun is a star made of hydrogen and helium gas – much like the early universe. But where did that original hydrogen and helium come from? And what about the rest of the periodic table of elements?

The story of our chemical makeup is the story of nucleosynthesis. Big Bang nucleosynthesis generated the seeds of hydrogen and helium within the first 20 minutes of the universe’s existence. Long after that, the first stars formed, where a process slightly more complicated than you might think produces some of the heavier elements. Stars can only produce atoms up to iron, however – the rest require far more energetic processes.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Saturday, 09/21/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Movie Night on Mt. Tam: The Martian

2015 film starring Matt Damon depicts the struggles of an astronaut left behind on Mars as he awaits rescue. Post-screening discussion by Jeffrey Silverman of Science VS Cinema

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, September 21
Sunset: 7:09 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 


 

Tuesday, 09/03/19 1:10 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Testing gravity with cosmology: efficient simulations, novel statistics and analytical approaches’

In the era of precision cosmology, a wide range of cosmological surveys, such as the LSST, DESI, Euclid and WFIRST will precisely probe the large-scale structure of the universe, shedding light on the nature of the dark sectors. Given how sensitively the growth of structure depends on the nature of the underlying gravitational field, this will be a unique opportunity to constrain the so-called Modified Gravity models (MG), that are theoretical alternatives to dark energy, which attempt to explain cosmic acceleration through a large-scale modification to general relativity. In order to fully utilize the wealth of incoming data, however, theoretical predictions of structure formation in such alternative scenarios are necessary. Due to the existence of an additional degree freedom, that these models introduce, N-body simulations prove to be highly computationally expensive. In the first part of the talk, I will discuss how we can overcome this issue by using Lagrangian hybrid techniques, which can lead to a speed-up by 2 orders of magnitude. Then I will proceed to introduce novel statistics that can help us more confidently detect MG signals hidden in cosmic density fields, by up-weighting the significance of cosmic voids, where the MG-ΛCDM degeneracy is broken. When structure formation is analytically tractable, finally, I will show that we can make accurate analytical predictions for the two-point statistics using Lagrangian perturbation theory and the Gaussian Streaming Model, simultaneously capturing the effects of both halo-bias and redshift space distortions, effects crucial in the context of spectroscopic surveys, for the first time in modified gravity.

Speaker: Georgios Valogainnis, Cornell

Website: https://cosmology.lbl.gov/sem_bcg_future.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 09/04/19
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

Mountain View Public Library
585 Franklin St
Mountain View, CA 94041

Physics vs. Time Travel

Everyone loves a good time travel story, but given what we know -- and don’t know -- about physics, is time travel in any way plausible? Using popular movies as a framework, Professor Ken Wharton will outline several distinct categories of consistent time travel stories, and discuss possible connections with actual physics. Ken Wharton is physics professor at San Jose State University. No registration required.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/science-talk-physics-vs-time-travel-tickets-68895515341?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Testing GR and the Massive Black Hole Paradigm with Infrared Interferometry

Adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of the central star cluster in the Galactic Center over the past three decades have established that there is a concentration of 4 million solar masses associated with the compact radio source SgrA*, presumably a massive black hole. In 2017 we put into operation GRAVITY, for combining the near-IR light of all four 8m UT telescopes of the ESO-VLT for milli-arcsec imaging, and for improving the astrometric measurement precision tenfold compared to our previous AO data. DUring the peri-passage of the star S2 in May 2018 we were able to robustly detect the gravitational redshift and test Einstein's equivalence principle in the orbital elements of the star, thus for the first time testing GR in the high mass regime. The detection of the Schwarzschild pression of the orbit is expected in the next year. During bright near-IR 'flares' SgrA* exhibts 100 micro-arcsec loops/wobbles, which may be interpreted as orbital motion of 'hot spots' in the accretion flow on scales of 4-5 R_S. If so, the mass within the hot spot orbits is consistent with the 4 million solar masses. The flares also exhibit polarization loops and we find that their orbital angular momentum is close to that of the OB-star disk at 10^5 R_S. I will end with an outlook how measurements with GRAVITY and the EHT can together test the Kerr metric on scales of a few R_S.

Speaker: Reinhard Genzel, Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/special-astrophysics-colloquium-testing-gr-and-massive-black-hole-paradigm-infrared

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Next Frontier of Low-Mass Galaxy Formation

Satellites of the Milky Way (MW) have long provided stringent tests of cosmic reionization, cold dark matter, and the physics of galaxy formation on the smallest scales. However, there is growing evidence that the MW satellites may not be broadly representative. Compared to the MW, satellite systems throughout the local Universe show varying luminosity functions, stellar populations, quenching properties, and spatial configurations, often in excess of cosmic variance. In this talk, I discuss ongoing efforts to expand our knowledge of low-mass galaxy formation beyond the confines of the MW halo. Specifically, I describe how new understanding of our nearest neighbor M31 and its satellites raise questions about whether insights established in MW satellites are generally applicable to low-mass systems or stem from the specific accretion history of the MW. I highlight a new Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program aimed at establishing the M31 ecosystem at the next frontier for low-mass galaxy studies. I also preview the potential of the James Webb Space Telescope and next-generation space-based telescopes (e. g. Luvoir) for facilitating detailed studies of low-mass galaxies throughout the Local Volume.

Speaker: Dan Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-09-05/Colloquium

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
06:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Triple Ring
39655 Eureka Dr
Newark, CA 94560

Searching for Life Beyond Earth

The concept of the Habitable Zone (HZ) was once the only way to estimate the chances of a planet to support life. The past decades of exploration in the Solar System and the study of terrestrial extreme environments have shown that the subsurface and interior of several planets and moons located outside the HZ had - or may still have - conditions suitable for the development and survival of life. Beyond the Solar System, the discovery of thousands of exoplanets gives us a chance to expand our understanding of planetary system formation and evolution, and infer their ability to develop biology. These recent discoveries also give us important information about the probability for the existence of other technologically advanced civilizations in the universe. While the current estimates of life potential, whether simple or complex, are based on concepts such as planetary habitability and the coevolution of life and environment, emerging new theories bridge biology, neuroscience, information technology, and quantum physics, and, if verified, would fundamentally change our views on the origin and nature of life, and the meaning of its exploration.

Speaker: Dr. Nathalie Cabrol, SETI

Advance registration required at weblink

Website: http://www.tripleringtech.com/september-5-2019-searching-for-life-beyond-earth/

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
07:30 PM - 10:00 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Galaxies Across Cosmic Time

For a century, astronomers have studied galaxies--- immense systems made up of gas, dust, dark matter, and stars--- to help us understand our place in the vast night sky. In this talk, I'll start by taking you on a journey through human time, from how early astronomers learned that the mysterious "island Universes" they observed at night are distant galaxies like our own Milky Way, to how modern astronomers use space telescopes to travel through time and peer into the distant past. Then, I'll take you on a journey through cosmic time and describe how galaxies grow and change over billion-year long timescales. Finally, we'll venture even further into the unknown and learn about one of the greatest unsolved mysteries about how galaxies evolve.

Speaker: Wren Suess, UC Berkeley

Stargazing follows the lecture from 8:30 - 10:00.

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-08-22/astro-night-1-1

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

City Star Parties - Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

San Francisco City Star Party @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco
Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.

Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/06/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Cryogenic Multiplexing for CMB Detector Arrays

Speaker: Cyndia Yu

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/cryogenic-multiplexing-cmb-detector-arrays

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/06/19 7:30 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Charon, Pluto’s Companion: What We’re Learning from New Horizons

Pluto’s large moon Charon turned out to be far more interesting than astronomers expected. Pluto was the star of the New Horizons show, but the features on Charon’s surface tell a fascinating tale of how icy worlds could form far from the gravitational influences of the giant planets. There is evidence of a world-wide sub-surface ocean early on, and of global expansion as that ocean froze solid. Charon’s surface also has a region of plains where icy materials may once have flowed and smoothed over the fractures present elsewhere on its surface. Dr. Beyer will be your guide through this story of formation and change in the frozen reaches of the outer Solar System.

Speaker: Dr. Ross Beyer, SETI Institute

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, September 6, 2019
8:30 PM to 10:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr ·
San Jose, CA

Details
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

=================================

Fri. 09/06/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/06/2019 and Sat. 09/07/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/06/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/07/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 09/07/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

MISSION: MARS

We are making progress globally - from the Arctic to Antarctica, from underground labs to the International Space Station - to achieve the first human voyage to Mars. Come explore the what, why, how, when, and who of our first journey to the Red Planet.

Speaker: Pascal Lee, SETI and Mars Institute

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/09/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Why Do Dark Matter Haloes Die Together? The Causes of Halo Assembly Bias at Galaxy Masses

At a constant mass, old dark matter haloes and young dark matter haloes cluster differently from one another. This fact, known as "assembly bias," severely complicates the construction of mock catalogues and serves as a major challenge for structure formation models. In this talk, I test and synthesize the many competing explanations for this phenomenon into a single cohesive story with a strong focus on low mass haloes.

Speaker: Philip Mansfield, Univ. of Chicago

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/why-do-dark-matter-haloes-die-together-causes-halo-assembly-bias-galaxy-masses

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/09/19
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture Series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Mapping the Universe: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, and investigate the origin of planets. SDSS will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art.

Speaker: Juna Kollmeier, Carnegie Institution for Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/mapping-the-universe-the-sloan-digital-sky-survey

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

==================================

Friday, 09/13/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Observations and modelling of gamma-ray flares in blazars

Speaker: Manuel Meyer

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/observations-and-modelling-gamma-ray-flares-blazars

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/13/19
07:00 PM - 08:30 PM

Bookshop West Portal
80 W Portal Ave
San Francisco, CA 94127

Wonderfest: Quantum Worlds

Quantum mechanics, the physics of the very small, is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in science. (Bear in mind: theory is as good as it gets in science!) Still, physicists themselves admit that they don't fully understand the quantum world. Caltech physicist and New York Times best-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way to understand the mysteries of the quantum world ... of quantum worlds.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/quantum-worlds/

Cost: Free

====================

Fri. 09/13/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

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Fri. 09/13/2019 and Sat. 09/14/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

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Fri. 09/13/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

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Sat. 09/14/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

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Saturday, 09/14/19
01:00 PM - 02:00 PM

Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way
Palo Alto, CA 94303

Sean Carroll: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Space-Time

Quantum mechanics is the most accurate and far-reaching theory in physics, yet physicists themselves readily admit that they don't understand it. But Caltech physicist and New York Timesbest-selling author Sean Carroll suggests that we do have a very promising way of understanding the mysteries of the quantum world.

This event was rescheduled from July 16.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sean-carroll-quantum-worlds-and-the-emergence-of-space-time-tickets-63771484226?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: $22 General, $15 Member, $8 Student

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Saturday, 09/14/19 7:30pm

Peninsual Astronomical Society
Los Altos Public Library
13 S. San Antonio Rd.
Los Altos, CA

"Getting the Astronomy Right in a Novel”

NORM SPERLING

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Saturday, 09/14/19 8:00 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Exploring Pluto, Charon & the outer reaches of the solar system

In 2015, the New Horizons spacecraft flew past icy Pluto and Charon and sent back the first images of these objects in the furthest outskirts of our solar system. I will review what we now know about Pluto and Charon, and how the study of these bodies has evolved. I'll also discuss the images received over the New Year from the much smaller icy object Ultima Thule.

Speaker: Francis Nimmo

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/264143602/

Cost: Free

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Sunday, 09/15/19
04:30 PM - 09:00 PM

USS Hornet
707 W Hornet Ave
Alameda, CA 94501

AIAA-SF Annual Banquet celebrating 50th anniversary of Apollo 11

This year, we are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 by hosting our annual banquet on the USS Hornet, the aircraft carrier that picked up the crew of Apollo 11 from the Pacific Ocean. During this event, we will have a buffet style dinner in the ship’s officers wardroom, a talk about the Apollo 11 Earth Landing System given by Anthony Smith, an engineer who was directly involved in its development, an awards session, and finally there will be a special Apollo 11 themed guided tour aboard the ship, including a special exhibit on the same theme.

This talk will consist of two main parts. The first part focuses on the pre-Apollo history, and gives a 10-year timespan overview of several milestones of the space program up to, and including, Apollo 11. The second part elaborates on the personal experiences of the speaker by means of a pre-recorded interview which was made for the Hornet Museum Archives. There will be an opportunity for Q&A at the end of the presentation.

Space is limited and prices go up after 9/8.

Website: https://aiaa-sf.org/event/aiaa-banquet-2019/

Cost: $19.00 - $49.00

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Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

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