In The Mail

up 

Peninsula Astronomical Society

Join us on our FaceBook page at: www.facebook.com/PeninsulaAstronomicalSociety

PAS March 2019 meeting is at a new location.

We have received the letter from NPS giving us the date of our weekend at Glacier Point this summer - assuming we actually get to go this year, it will be August 2 and 3.

So far they are saying that Bridalveil Creek campground will not open until at least August 1 this year, IF it opens at all (not very likely, based on past experience). Astronomy clubs are being given camping space in the NPS Volunteer campground, which is in Yosemite Valley.
( Update June 6 )
PAS Invitation
     



Fremont Peak Obsevatory Association

FPOA Spring Newsletter .pdf, local copy.

FPOA Summer Newsletter .pdf, local copy.
 
 
        UCSC

Extra-solar Planet Search
http://www.oklo.org/
 
     
 
NASA Exploration Center  
 
   

Planets around other stars, extra-solar planets

TESS Exoplanet Mission

Kepler Mission

 
   

Planetary Geology
Design your own Lunar, Martian or Astrodial fly over
using actual data from Planetary probes.
(Parts of trek are still under beta test.)

https://trek.nasa.gov/
 
 

Gravity Wave Detectors

LIGO, Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory.
Links:
https://www.ligo.caltech.edu/page/detection-companion-papers

https://www.gw-openscience.org/start/

https://wiki.gw-astronomy.org/OpenLVEM/WebHome

Virgo in Italy http://www.virgo-gw.eu/
 
    
 Chabot Space and Science Center
 
 

Return to aug.htm


In the email

For more recent email go to sept-mail.htm 


In the email


In the email

— Sent on behalf of Alex Filippenko —

Subject: Perseid meteor shower this week

Dear Friend of Lick Observatory,

I want to alert you to an upcoming (this week and weekend) celestial
phenomenon: the Perseid meteor shower. Of course, you know about
meteor showers and might already have this information, but perhaps
it will be helpful anyway. Feel free to distribute the note to your family
and friends, if you want to.

The annual Perseid meteor shower (arguably the best meteor shower
of the year) will peak on the nights of August 11/12 (Sunday/Monday)
and (slightly more) 12/13 (Monday/Tuesday), but the nights of August
9/10 (Friday/Saturday), 10/11 (Saturday/Sunday), and 13/14
(Tuesday/Wednesday -- but essentially full moon) should be pretty
good as well. View them after 11 pm local time -- or better, after
1-2 am; the dark predawn hours should actually yield the largest
hourly rate. [Before about 11 pm, few Perseids are visible (though
they should be longer streaks than average, skimming through Earth’s
atmosphere because the “radiant” from which they appear to come
will be closer to the horizon).] Also, you don’t have to account
for your specific *time zone* — the times I list above are fine
*regardless* of where you are (though the northern hemisphere is
much more favorable than the southern hemisphere, for this shower).

Unfortunately, moonlight will be a big problem this year: full moon
will be on Wednesday night, August 14/15, so we'll have a bright
waxing gibbous moon during the weekend. If you can be up in the
dark pre-dawn hours after moonset, you best bets are the mornings
of Sunday (August 11) and Monday (August 12) instead of Tuesday,
August 13 -- there will be more dark time before dawn. However,
if you *don't* want to wake up so early (or stay up so late!),
I suggest you watch after 11 pm or midnight on any of the nights
mentioned above. Some meteors will even be visible this entire
week (i.e., starting tonight), and the Moon won't be as much
of a problem (indeed, it will set around midnight on Wednesday,
August 7; even earlier before August 7, later after August 7).

The meteor shower occurs because Earth flies through debris from
Comet Swift-Tuttle, and the little bits of rock and ice will burn
up as they zip through Earth's upper atmosphere (altitude about
60 miles) at roughly 130,000 miles/hour. ("Shooting stars" or
"falling stars" are not stars at all, of course!)

I encourage you to view the meteor shower, for at least half an hour
(but an hour or longer is better). Try to get as far away from city
lights as possible. The Perseids are known for having many bright and
fast meteors that should be visible even in a somewhat light-polluted
sky (as will be the case because of the gibbous moon this weekend),
though you’ll see many more from a darker location and after the
Moon has set. *NO* binoculars or telescopes are needed; just look
at the sky with your unaided eyes after getting dark-adapted (this
can take about 15 minutes). Choose a wide-open sky, without buildings
or trees in the way. Dress warmly, and pack a hot beverage if you
want to. Bug spray might be useful, too, depending on where you are.
You should lie down on a mattress, sleeping bag, or reclining lawn
chair for greater comfort, if you wish.

Looking anywhere in the sky is fine, but views to the northeast should
provide the most meteors. If you have clear skies, you might see 1-2
dozen per hour. The meteor rate will be highest when viewed from the
northern (not southern) hemisphere.

There are many useful references with additional information and
viewing tips, etc.; type "Perseid meteor shower 2019” in your
favorite search engine. See, for example,

https://www.space.com/32868-perseid-meteor-shower-guide.html

and

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/meteor-shower/perseid.html.

More generally, here are comments on meteor showers in 2019:

https://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/best-meteor-showers-in-2019/.

Alex Filippenko
President, Lick Observatory Council
==============================================


In the email

Dear UC Astronomers,

On August 1st, the IEEE will dedicate a bronze plaque at Lick Observatory's Shane Telescope
honoring Lick's Lunar Laser Ranging Experiment (LURE).
LURE measured the distance to the moon using a retroreflector emplaced there by the Apollo 11 astronauts.

This is a very nice honor from the IEEE.
LURE joins the varied and notable ranks of other IEEE Milestone honorees.
Among these are the reception of the first transatlantic radio signals,
the first semiconductor integrated circuit, the first atomic clock, Moore's Law,
the first public demonstration of television, high temperature superconductivity,
and interactive video games. Quite a nice crowd to be associated with, if you ask me!

I want to call your attention to two nice press releases related to the event:

1) Lick Observatory commemorates Apollo 11 experiment on 50th anniversary describes the plaque
and the laser ranging technology used to measure the distance to the moon.

2) Apollo 11 anniversary: Lick Observatory scientists recall landmark experiment 40 years ago,
in which UC scientists who were present at the laser ranging event describe how the experiment
was rapidly put together for NASA, and what it has meant to them on a more personal level.

Best regards,
Claire Max  

More on this subject.


In the email

NASA video, how cooronagraphs are used to find extra solar Planets
https://exoplanets.nasa.gov/exep/coronagraphvideo/


In the email

Synthetic Aperature Radar, on UTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MViVyocQhVw


In the email

Stanford Gravitationl Wave, lecture on UTube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-i_ARhHfbpg 


In the email

email is listed with the most recent at the top.

 

 



Ken L's Bay Astro Event List,
Most recent at the top


For years, Kenneth Lum of EAS (and SMCAS ) has been compiling and distributing to EAS members a listing of upcoming events
pertinent to astronomy topics.
For some years now, I have been updating the AANC calendar page with that information,
but have not let the AANC contacts list know about it.
So the purpose of this message is to let you know about the update of the AANC calendar page.
https://sites.google.com/site/aancsite/calendar

-Alan Gould





Monday, 08/26/19
07:00 PM - 10:30 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Nite East Bay #78: Art and Math, Punishment and Gravitational Waves

==========

Art Experiments With Math in 20 Minutes

In a rapid fire art extravaganza, Nerd Nite will zip through the world of strange, quirky, and beautiful mathematics that you never learned about in school, and explore how math can be used to define new artistic forms. See paradoxes, puzzles, infinities, chaos, fractals, surreals and automata, and learn how our conception of art often relies on numbers and relationships just below the surface.

Speaker: Roger Antonsen, University of Oslo

==========

You've Been Bad: What Science Says About Punishment and Human Behavior

The last decade has brought a long overdue reexamination of retribution as a criminal deterrent, with a growing acceptance that modern criminal justice policy rooted in ancient morality and religious traditions may not be as relevant in the modern world. Learn about the direct connections between the Bible and policies still in force today. Then see the real statistics that support (or refute) shaming, caning, community service, the death penalty, and incarceration, and learn the lessons this new data holds for crime prevention, parenting and even pet-rearing.

Speaker: Sara Yousuf, The Justice Colaborative

==========

How Einstein’s Gravitational Waves Discovered Gold and Explored the Universe

Scientists have recently developed a new way to explore the universe, using gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein nearly a century ago. See how these waves illuminate some of the most exotic objects in the cosmos, including star corpses and neutron stars. Then learn how these new techniques recently solved one of the enduring mysteries of the universe, identifying the interstellar source of the gold, platinum, uranium, and even Californium that we now have on earth.

Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/1473628446110553/

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

==================================

Tuesday, 08/27/19
07:15 PM - 09:00 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Charon, Pluto’s Companion

Dr. Ross Beyer, NASA Ames and SETI, will discuss what the New Horizons space probe revealed about the surface of Pluto’s moon Charon. The probe showed evidence of a sub-surface ocean early on and Charon’s surface suggests how icy worlds can form far from the gravitational influences of giant planets.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-charon-plutos-companion-tickets-68752190653?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 08/28/19 7:30 PM

Crepe Place
1134 Soquel Ave
Santa Cruz, CA 95062

The Social and Ecolological Impacts of Light Pollution in Santa Cruz

Join Santa Cruz IDA chapter members Lisa Heschong and Andy Kreyche for a discussion of how light pollution in Santa Cruz impacts our local environment. We will review recent research on circadian disruption of plants, animals and humans by exposure to artificial light at night. Plants and animals depend on Earth’s natural cycle of daylight and night-time darkness to govern the rhythms of life sustaining behaviors, including metabolic activity, immune response, feeding behaviors, migration, reproduction, growth, development, and essential sleep. Lab and field studies are starting to fill in the detail of how light pollution can cause profound ecological disruption and potentially collapse. The local IDA chapter has surveyed conditions around Santa Cruz with a nighttime aerial photography, and has started to identify strategies to reduce the most egregious sources of light pollution in our area, while respecting our social and cultural desire for nighttime light.

Website: https://wiseucsc.wixsite.com/wise/science-on-tap

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 08/30/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/30/2019 and Sat. 08/31/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/30/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/31/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, August 31
Sunset: 7:41 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Wednesday, 09/04/19
06:00 PM - 07:30 PM

Mountain View Public Library
585 Franklin St
Mountain View, CA 94041

Physics vs. Time Travel

Everyone loves a good time travel story, but given what we know -- and don’t know -- about physics, is time travel in any way plausible? Using popular movies as a framework, Professor Ken Wharton will outline several distinct categories of consistent time travel stories, and discuss possible connections with actual physics. Ken Wharton is physics professor at San Jose State University. No registration required.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/science-talk-physics-vs-time-travel-tickets-68895515341?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Kavli Institute Astrophysics Colloquium
Physics and Astrophysics Building Room 102/103
452 Lomita Mall
Stanford, CA 94305

Testing GR and the Massive Black Hole Paradigm with Infrared Interferometry

Adaptive optics (AO) imaging and spectroscopy of the central star cluster in the Galactic Center over the past three decades have established that there is a concentration of 4 million solar masses associated with the compact radio source SgrA*, presumably a massive black hole. In 2017 we put into operation GRAVITY, for combining the near-IR light of all four 8m UT telescopes of the ESO-VLT for milli-arcsec imaging, and for improving the astrometric measurement precision tenfold compared to our previous AO data. DUring the peri-passage of the star S2 in May 2018 we were able to robustly detect the gravitational redshift and test Einstein's equivalence principle in the orbital elements of the star, thus for the first time testing GR in the high mass regime. The detection of the Schwarzschild pression of the orbit is expected in the next year. During bright near-IR 'flares' SgrA* exhibts 100 micro-arcsec loops/wobbles, which may be interpreted as orbital motion of 'hot spots' in the accretion flow on scales of 4-5 R_S. If so, the mass within the hot spot orbits is consistent with the 4 million solar masses. The flares also exhibit polarization loops and we find that their orbital angular momentum is close to that of the OB-star disk at 10^5 R_S. I will end with an outlook how measurements with GRAVITY and the EHT can together test the Kerr metric on scales of a few R_S.

Speaker: Reinhard Genzel, Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/special-astrophysics-colloquium-testing-gr-and-massive-black-hole-paradigm-infrared

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19 4:00 PM

LeConte Hall, Rm 1
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

The Next Frontier of Low-Mass Galaxy Formation

Satellites of the Milky Way (MW) have long provided stringent tests of cosmic reionization, cold dark matter, and the physics of galaxy formation on the smallest scales. However, there is growing evidence that the MW satellites may not be broadly representative. Compared to the MW, satellite systems throughout the local Universe show varying luminosity functions, stellar populations, quenching properties, and spatial configurations, often in excess of cosmic variance. In this talk, I discuss ongoing efforts to expand our knowledge of low-mass galaxy formation beyond the confines of the MW halo. Specifically, I describe how new understanding of our nearest neighbor M31 and its satellites raise questions about whether insights established in MW satellites are generally applicable to low-mass systems or stem from the specific accretion history of the MW. I highlight a new Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program aimed at establishing the M31 ecosystem at the next frontier for low-mass galaxy studies. I also preview the potential of the James Webb Space Telescope and next-generation space-based telescopes (e. g. Luvoir) for facilitating detailed studies of low-mass galaxies throughout the Local Volume.

Speaker: Dan Weisz, UC Berkeley

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-09-05/Colloquium

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
07:30 PM - 10:00 PM

Astronomy Night
Campbell Hall
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Astro Night: Galaxies Across Cosmic Time

For a century, astronomers have studied galaxies--- immense systems made up of gas, dust, dark matter, and stars--- to help us understand our place in the vast night sky. In this talk, I'll start by taking you on a journey through human time, from how early astronomers learned that the mysterious "island Universes" they observed at night are distant galaxies like our own Milky Way, to how modern astronomers use space telescopes to travel through time and peer into the distant past. Then, I'll take you on a journey through cosmic time and describe how galaxies grow and change over billion-year long timescales. Finally, we'll venture even further into the unknown and learn about one of the greatest unsolved mysteries about how galaxies evolve.

Speaker: Wren Suess, UC Berkeley

Stargazing follows the lecture from 8:30 - 10:00.

Website: https://astro.berkeley.edu/event/2019-08-22/astro-night-1-1

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 09/05/19
07:30 PM - 10:30 PM

City Star Parties - Parade Grounds at the Presidio
103 Montgomery St.
Main Post Lawn
San Francisco, CA 94129

San Francisco City Star Party @ Parade Grounds in the Presidio of San Francisco
Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.

Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 09/06/19 7:30 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Charon, Pluto’s Companion: What We’re Learning from New Horizons

Pluto’s large moon Charon turned out to be far more interesting than astronomers expected. Pluto was the star of the New Horizons show, but the features on Charon’s surface tell a fascinating tale of how icy worlds could form far from the gravitational influences of the giant planets. There is evidence of a world-wide sub-surface ocean early on, and of global expansion as that ocean froze solid. Charon’s surface also has a region of plains where icy materials may once have flowed and smoothed over the fractures present elsewhere on its surface. Dr. Beyer will be your guide through this story of formation and change in the frozen reaches of the outer Solar System.

Speaker: Dr. Ross Beyer, SETI Institute

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/meetings.html

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, September 6, 2019
8:30 PM to 10:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr ·
San Jose, CA

Details
Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

=================================

Fri. 09/06/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 09/06/2019 and Sat. 09/07/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 09/06/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 09/07/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 09/07/19 7:30 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

MISSION: MARS

We are making progress globally - from the Arctic to Antarctica, from underground labs to the International Space Station - to achieve the first human voyage to Mars. Come explore the what, why, how, when, and who of our first journey to the Red Planet.

Speaker: Pascal Lee, SETI and Mars Institute

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 09/09/19
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lecture Series
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

Mapping the Universe: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, and investigate the origin of planets. SDSS will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art.

Speaker: Juna Kollmeier, Carnegie Institution for Science

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/mapping-the-universe-the-sloan-digital-sky-survey

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 
 



Monday, 08/19/19
07:15 PM - 09:00 PM

Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Northern Lights Excite

Please join the Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society for our general meeting featuring Dr. Laura Peticolas, Sonoma State University. Dr. Peticolas will discuss auroras, and the mysteries scientists are still uncovering about these displays here and on other planets in our solar system. The meeting starts at 7:15 p.m. with a short “What’s Up” presented by MDAS President Steve Jacobs, who will give a nova primer and explain where to find the novae in our galaxy.

Editor's Note: This lecture will also be presented on August 17 in San Jose. See our listing.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-northern-lights-excite-tickets-65156684397?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 08/21/19
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Burlingame Public Library
480 Primrose Road
Burlingame, CA 94010

Astronomy for Everyone: Size and Scale of the Universe
A Journey through the Cosmos!

In celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, join us for this exciting program about the universe from the very small to the very large!

Astronomer Kevin Manning will take us on a virtual journey through the cosmos, followed by a trip outside to view celestial objects through a powerful hand-crafted telescope. This presentation is geared toward adults, but younger astronomy lovers are welcome.

There will be a raffle for a copy of the National Geographic Backyard Guide to the Night Sky, plus the ticket enters you into a raffle for the Summer Reading grand prize of an Orion telescope!

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-for-everyone-size-scale-of-the-universe-tickets-64689006560?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, August 21, 7:30pm

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way, SF

“Cosmic Gold: Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and the Origin of the Heavy Elements”

Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Scientists have recently developed a new way to “see” the universe, using the gravitational waves predicted by Einstein nearly a century ago. These waves can teach us about some of the most exotic objects known, including star “corpses” known as black holes and neutron stars. Remarkably, they have also helped solve a longstanding puzzle about where in the Universe some of the elements we know and love here on Earth are produced, including gold, platinum, uranium, and even Californium!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

==================================

Wed, Aug 21 8:00pm

Blue River Technology
605 W California Ave.
Sunnyvale, CA 94086

Super-Massive Black Hole Pairs – Aug 21

The detection of gravitational waves from merging stellar-mass black holes has generated much excitement. We expect that similar events — but with black holes that are millions to billions of times heavier — can occasionally occur. Dr. Romani will describe observations of super-massive black hole "binaries." He will also discuss the search for such binaries that can eventually merge to produce the "loudest" signals in the universe — as the two super-massive black holes conclude their cosmic dance.

Our speaker, Roger Romani, is Professor of Physics at Stanford University.

Website: http://wonderfest.org/black-hole-pairs/

==================================

Friday, 08/23/19
07:30 PM - 08:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Astronomy 101: Sights of the Cosmos, Intro to Astronomy

This event provides a different introduction to astronomy than our Intro to the Night Sky talks. During this hour, you'll gain an appreciation for the size and scale of the cosmos and our place within it. You'll see many examples of the beautiful objects visible in the night sky, learn something about how we see them through our telescopes and what we can deduce about them through the light they send us. And then you can make your own prediction of whether we're alone in the universe.

This talk is free of charge. Just come by and enjoy the show. After the talk, you can check out telescopes that will be set up as part of our In-Town Star Party. (See *In Town Star Party - 3Q* event on Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/257516641/)

The talk will be presented by Wolf Witt. Wolf is not an actual astronomer, nor has he ever played one on TV. However, he's been interested in outer space since he was a kid and still thinks that the universe is an amazing place. He's been with SJAA for six years, and now he'll share with you his enthusiasm and some of what he's learned about the cosmos. Maybe you'll think it's amazing, too.

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/262541810/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 08/23/19
08:00 PM - 12:30 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Lick Observatory Evening with the Stars - SOLD OUT
Speaker: Dr. Vivian U, UC Irvine

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/2019august23.shtml

Cost: $25

==================================

Friday, August 23, 2019
8:45 PM to 10:45 PM

San Jose Astronomical Society In Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Fri. 08/23/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/23/2019 and Sat. 08/24/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/23/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/24/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, August 24
Sunset: 7:50 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Saturday, 08/24/19
08:00 PM - 12:30 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Cosmic Alchemy in the Era of Gravitational Wave Astronomy - SOLD OUT

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). He is also the Niels Bohr Professor at the Niels Bohr Institute. After studying at the University of Cambridge, he was the John Bahcall Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Since joining the UCSC faculty in 2007, Ramirez-Ruiz has won a number of national awards for his research, including a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Kavli and Racliffe Fellowships. He is also a highly regarded teacher and public lecturer. In 2010, he was elected a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. Then 34, he was the youngest scientist ever elected to the academy.

Musical performers: Dave Rocha Quartet

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/music/2019august24.shtml

Cost: $50 - $199

==================================

Monday, 08/26/19
07:00 PM - 10:30 PM

Club 21
2111 Franklin St
Oakland, CA 94612

Nerd Nite East Bay #78: Art and Math, Punishment and Gravitational Waves

==========

Art Experiments With Math in 20 Minutes

In a rapid fire art extravaganza, Nerd Nite will zip through the world of strange, quirky, and beautiful mathematics that you never learned about in school, and explore how math can be used to define new artistic forms. See paradoxes, puzzles, infinities, chaos, fractals, surreals and automata, and learn how our conception of art often relies on numbers and relationships just below the surface.

Speaker: Roger Antonsen, University of Oslo

==========

You've Been Bad: What Science Says About Punishment and Human Behavior

The last decade has brought a long overdue reexamination of retribution as a criminal deterrent, with a growing acceptance that modern criminal justice policy rooted in ancient morality and religious traditions may not be as relevant in the modern world. Learn about the direct connections between the Bible and policies still in force today. Then see the real statistics that support (or refute) shaming, caning, community service, the death penalty, and incarceration, and learn the lessons this new data holds for crime prevention, parenting and even pet-rearing.

Speaker: Sara Yousuf, The Justice Colaborative

==========

How Einstein’s Gravitational Waves Discovered Gold and Explored the Universe

Scientists have recently developed a new way to explore the universe, using gravitational waves predicted by Albert Einstein nearly a century ago. See how these waves illuminate some of the most exotic objects in the cosmos, including star corpses and neutron stars. Then learn how these new techniques recently solved one of the enduring mysteries of the universe, identifying the interstellar source of the gold, platinum, uranium, and even Californium that we now have on earth.

Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Website: https://www.facebook.com/events/1473628446110553/

Cost: $8 Advance, $10 at door

==================================

Tuesday, 08/27/19
07:15 PM - 09:00 PM

Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society
Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Charon, Pluto’s Companion

Dr. Ross Beyer, NASA Ames and SETI, will discuss what the New Horizons space probe revealed about the surface of Pluto’s moon Charon. The probe showed evidence of a sub-surface ocean early on and Charon’s surface suggests how icy worlds can form far from the gravitational influences of giant planets.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-charon-plutos-companion-tickets-68752190653?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 08/28/19 7:30 PM

Crepe Place
1134 Soquel Ave
Santa Cruz, CA 95062

The Social and Ecolological Impacts of Light Pollution in Santa Cruz

Join Santa Cruz IDA chapter members Lisa Heschong and Andy Kreyche for a discussion of how light pollution in Santa Cruz impacts our local environment. We will review recent research on circadian disruption of plants, animals and humans by exposure to artificial light at night. Plants and animals depend on Earth’s natural cycle of daylight and night-time darkness to govern the rhythms of life sustaining behaviors, including metabolic activity, immune response, feeding behaviors, migration, reproduction, growth, development, and essential sleep. Lab and field studies are starting to fill in the detail of how light pollution can cause profound ecological disruption and potentially collapse. The local IDA chapter has surveyed conditions around Santa Cruz with a nighttime aerial photography, and has started to identify strategies to reduce the most egregious sources of light pollution in our area, while respecting our social and cultural desire for nighttime light.

Website: https://wiseucsc.wixsite.com/wise/science-on-tap

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 08/30/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/30/2019 and Sat. 08/31/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/30/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/31/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, August 31
Sunset: 7:41 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies

 
 




Monday, 08/12/19
11:00 PM - 03:00 AM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Perseid Meteor Shower

Hang out on our new observation deck and be dazzled as you watch the spectacular Perseid Meteor Shower make it annual trip through our atmosphere and light up the night sky. Our astronomers are on hand to answer questions. Hot chocolate and other goodies will be available.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/perseid-meteor-shower/

Cost: TBA

==================================

Tuesday, 08/13/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Evolution of SN1987A: From Progenitor Star To 30 Years After the Explosion

Speaker: Shigehiro Nagataki, Riken Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/evolution-sn1987a-progenitor-star-30-years-after-explosion

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 08/15/19
01:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Google Cloud
803 11th Ave
Sunnyvale, CA 94089

NASA Frontier Development Lab Artificial Institute Results Showcase

NASA Ames and the SETI Institute invite you to hear the results of this year's FDL AI research sprint. Join FDL's private sector partners and new space industry partners at what has become an exciting annual event.

Now in its fourth year, FDL's 8-week interdisciplinary research format has proved to be a successful model. FDL participants have delivered consistent and substantive AI applications over an extremely accelerated timespan.

By harnessing the expertise and enormous compute capacity of FDL's Silicon Valley partners (including Google Cloud, Intel AI, IBM, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Nvidia, Kx and Element AI) along with leaders in emerging space (such as the Luxembourg Space Agency, Canadian Space Agency, and Lockheed Martin), FDL is effectively using AI and machine learning to address important science and exploration questions.

This year the results showcase will be hosted at Google Cloud HQ, in Sunnyvale where FDL teams will share results in the following problem areas:

• EXPANDING THE CAPABILITIES OF NASA’S SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY.
• SUPER-RESOLUTION MAPS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD COVERING 40 YEARS OF SPACE WEATHER EVENTS.
• ENHANCED PREDICTABILITY OF GNSS DISTURBANCES.
• LUNAR RESOURCE MAPPING / SUPER RESOLUTION.
• DISASTER PREVENTION, PROGRESS AND RESPONSE.
• GENERATION OF SIMULATED BIOSENSOR DATA
The exciting results of this year’s FDL will be followed by a Panel Discussion on the future of AI and space and Networking.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nasa-fdl-ai-results-showcase-2019-tickets-64577345579

Cost: Free with RSVP

==================================

Thursday, 08/15/19
06:30 PM - 09:00 PM

b8ta
590 Hayes St
San Francisco, CA 94102

CNET | Engage: Mars

We're going to Mars! Discover how NASA is planning for interplanetary travel in our generation and the long-term effects of this journey on human health.
Meet one of the brilliant minds helping to plan this initiative, and learn how NASA is preparing for this historic tipping point. Hosted by b8ta's President Phillip Raub, join us as he welcomes CNET's Lindsey Turrentine and Dr. Aenor Sawyer of NASA's TRISH program.
During this inspiring session, get an insider's look at how NASA and its team of researchers are contemplating the challenges, opportunities, and realities of traveling to Mars in our lifetime.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/cnet-engage-a-live-speaker-series-tickets-68040076701?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 08/16/19
07:15 PM - 08:20 PM

Room S140, Evergreen Valley College
3095 Yerba Buena Rd
San Jose, CA 95135

400 Years of the Telescope - A Journey of Science, Technology and Thought.

For the evening of 16 August, 2019 we will be showing a documentary video "400 Years of the Telescope - A Journey of Science, Technology and Thought". In 1609 Galileo turned his spyglass to the heavens and was able to see things no one else had seen before. His simple telescope changed the way humans could view the universe. It will be 60 minutes in length.

Keep looking up you're bound to find something new.

Website: https://www.meetup.com/Starry-Evergreen-at-the-Montgomery-Hill-Observatory/events/263281202/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 08/16/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Chabot Observatory's Role in the Rescue of Apollo 13

In April, 1970 an explosion occurred aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft as it neared the Moon. All around the world various people from many walks of life leapt into action in many different roles to help save the astronauts' lives. One of the most unusual examples of this occurred at the old nearby Chabot Observatory in Oakland, where a number of nerdy and scientifically enthusiastic young high school and college kids tracked the Apollo 13 Capsule with several of the large telescopes there. It was my very great privilege to be one of those kids. Under the brilliant and energetic leadership of Dr. Terry Galloway, who had recently received his PhD from Caltech, we provided information that helped confirm that Apollo 13 was on the correct trajectory to safely return to earth.

In my talk, using images, charts, old newspapers, the Apollo 13 accident report, and videos from various documentaries about Apollo 13 as well as the Ron Howard movie, I will go into some substantial detail as to what the profile of a "normal" Apollo mission would be like, why and how the Apollo 13 accident occurred, and how the accident lead to a deviation from normal navigational procedures that made Chabot's and other observatories optical observations more important, especially the night before reentry. I'll describe how magical, majestic and beautiful the command and service module and the third stage of the Saturn Five looked through Rachel, the 20 inch refractor at Chabot, as they stately drifted through space across the field of view. I will discuss the normal role and function of the deep space network and how it changed on this mission, as well as a very little known but very important fact about the DSN that puts the story into a very different light. I will also tell the amazing and unbelievable story of how our efforts at Chabot Observatory became a remarkable example of how important astronomy outreach can be and how it changed the future!

Finally, for fun, we will see a couple of segments from the Ron Howard Apollo 13 movie (which, to make clear, I love!) and we will play the "How many scientific, engineering, and factual errors can you find?" game.

Speaker: Dave Rodrigues, East Bay Astronomical Society

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 08/16/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/16/2019 and Sat. 08/17/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/16/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/17/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 08/17/19
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Black Holes, Big and Small- A laser-guided adaptive optics view

Black holes come in at least two varieties. Supermassive black holes lay at the centers of galaxies and, while not theoretically predicted, have been definitively proven to exist using observations of stars’ orbits at the heart of the Milky Way. Stellar mass black holes are predicted to exist in large numbers - 100 million in our Galaxy alone - but only two dozen have been found, all in binaries.

Prof. Lu will present past, current, and upcoming experiments to hunt for the invisible stellar mass black holes and study how the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center impacts its environment. These experiments utilize the power of the world’s largest telescopes equipped with laser-guide star adaptive optics to correct image blurring from the Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. Prof. Lu will also discuss how advances in adaptive optics will sharpen our view of the Universe for black hole research and beyond.

Speaker: Jessica Lu, UC Berkeley

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar.html?event_ID=126754&date=2019-08-17&tab=lectures

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, August 17, 2019 7:30 P.M.

East Bay Astronomical Society
Galileo Room
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Exploring Planetary Surfaces with NASA’s Solar System Treks
Our Speaker is Brian Day, NASA Ames

NASA’s Solar System Treks project produces a suite of online, interactive visualization and analysis portals. These tools enable mission planners, planetary scientists, and engineers to access data products from a wide range of instruments aboard a variety of past and current missions, for a growing number of planetary bodies. Originally planned for mission planning and science, this technology has shown great benefits for public outreach. As new missions are being planned to a variety of planetary bodies, these tools are facilitating the public’s understanding of the missions and engaging the public in the process of identifying and selecting where these missions will land.

There are now seven web portals in the program available to the public. This expanded list includes portals for the Moon, Mars, Vesta, Ceres, and Titan. Icy Moons Trek features seven of Saturn’s smaller icy moons. The latest addition is the new Mercury Trek portal. All of these are unified under a new project home site with supporting content. As web-based toolsets, the portals do not require users to purchase or install any software beyond current standard web browsers.

Using the portals, students and members of the public can conduct their own explorations of planetary surfaces, measuring diameters of craters, creating elevation profiles of peaks and valleys, and plotting traverse paths. The standardized Trek interface provides enhanced 3D visualization and navigation. Standard keyboard gaming controls allow the user to maneuver a first-person visualization of “flying” across planetary surfaces. User-specified bounding boxes can be used to generate STL and/or OBJ files to create physical models of surface features with 3D printers. Users can also create on-the-fly VR experiences by drawing a path across the surface using the browser interface. A QR code is then generated which is read by the user’s smart phone. Placing the phone in an inexpensive set of Google Cardboard-compatible goggles, the user then flies along their specified path in virtual reality.

The presentation will showcase the capabilities of the portals with examples from a number of planetary bodies including the Moon, Mars, Ceres, Mercury, and more.

Dr. Day works at NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute where he serves as Lead for Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling. He has participated in various Mars analog field studies in extreme, Mars-like environments here in Earth. He previously served as Education and Public Outreach Lead for the LCROSS and LADEE robotic missions to the Moon. In 2007 he flew on NASA’s Aurigid MAC mission to record debris from Comet Kiess burning up in Earth’s upper atmosphere.

FOR MORE INFO and to PLAY WITH THE WEB SITE SEE: TREK.NASA.GOV

A special note from your program director:

This meeting will be a historic one for EAS! It will be the first meeting (but hopefully not the last! < ;^) ), where Virtual Reality will be part of the program.

Website: http://eastbayastro.org/events/

==================================

Monday, 08/19/19
07:15 PM - 09:00 PM

Lindsay Wildlife Experience
1931 First Ave
Walnut Creek, CA 94597

Northern Lights Excite

Please join the Mt. Diablo Astronomical Society for our general meeting featuring Dr. Laura Peticolas, Sonoma State University. Dr. Peticolas will discuss auroras, and the mysteries scientists are still uncovering about these displays here and on other planets in our solar system. The meeting starts at 7:15 p.m. with a short “What’s Up” presented by MDAS President Steve Jacobs, who will give a nova primer and explain where to find the novae in our galaxy.

Editor's Note: This lecture will also be presented on August 17 in San Jose. See our listing.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-lecture-northern-lights-excite-tickets-65156684397?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, 08/21/19
07:00 PM - 09:00 PM

Burlingame Public Library
480 Primrose Road
Burlingame, CA 94010

Astronomy for Everyone: Size and Scale of the Universe
A Journey through the Cosmos!

In celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing, join us for this exciting program about the universe from the very small to the very large!

Astronomer Kevin Manning will take us on a virtual journey through the cosmos, followed by a trip outside to view celestial objects through a powerful hand-crafted telescope. This presentation is geared toward adults, but younger astronomy lovers are welcome.

There will be a raffle for a copy of the National Geographic Backyard Guide to the Night Sky, plus the ticket enters you into a raffle for the Summer Reading grand prize of an Orion telescope!

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/astronomy-for-everyone-size-scale-of-the-universe-tickets-64689006560?aff=ebdssbdestsearch

Cost: Free

==================================

Wednesday, August 21, 7:30pm

San Francisco Amateur Astronomers
Randall Museum Theater
199 Museum Way, SF

“Cosmic Gold: Neutron Star Mergers, Gravitational Waves, and the Origin of the Heavy Elements”

Eliot Quataert, UC Berkeley

Scientists have recently developed a new way to “see” the universe, using the gravitational waves predicted by Einstein nearly a century ago. These waves can teach us about some of the most exotic objects known, including star “corpses” known as black holes and neutron stars. Remarkably, they have also helped solve a longstanding puzzle about where in the Universe some of the elements we know and love here on Earth are produced, including gold, platinum, uranium, and even Californium!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/monthly_lectures/randall/

==================================

Friday, 08/23/19
07:30 PM - 08:30 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Drive
San Jose, CA 95124

Astronomy 101: Sights of the Cosmos, Intro to Astronomy

This event provides a different introduction to astronomy than our Intro to the Night Sky talks. During this hour, you'll gain an appreciation for the size and scale of the cosmos and our place within it. You'll see many examples of the beautiful objects visible in the night sky, learn something about how we see them through our telescopes and what we can deduce about them through the light they send us. And then you can make your own prediction of whether we're alone in the universe.

This talk is free of charge. Just come by and enjoy the show. After the talk, you can check out telescopes that will be set up as part of our In-Town Star Party. (See *In Town Star Party - 3Q* event on Meetup: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/257516641/)

The talk will be presented by Wolf Witt. Wolf is not an actual astronomer, nor has he ever played one on TV. However, he's been interested in outer space since he was a kid and still thinks that the universe is an amazing place. He's been with SJAA for six years, and now he'll share with you his enthusiasm and some of what he's learned about the cosmos. Maybe you'll think it's amazing, too.

Website: https://www.meetup.com/SJ-Astronomy/events/262541810/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 08/23/19
08:00 PM - 12:30 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Lick Observatory Evening with the Stars - SOLD OUT
Speaker: Dr. Vivian U, UC Irvine

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/2019august23.shtml

Cost: $25

==================================

Fri. 08/23/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/23/2019 and Sat. 08/24/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/23/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/24/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, August 24
Sunset: 7:50 PM

San Mateo Co. Astronomical Society
Public Star Parties
at Crestview Park
1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

SMCAS and the City of San Carlos Parks Department host a public star party at Crestview Park in San Carlos twice a month when there is a new moon. Members set up telescopes and let the public view and share their knowledge of the night sky all for Free. All ages are welcome. If you have kids interested in space or science, bring them here for a real time view of planets, nebula, star clusters, and galaxies.

If you are a Non-member and own a telescope, bring it to share! Experts are available if you need assistance or have questions about buying a telescope.

Telescope setup begins at sunset and observing starts one hour after sunset. In the event of inclement weather (rain, clouds, fog, or high winds) the star party will be cancelled. Because each astronomer makes his or her own decision about bringing their telescope, there is no official cancellation notice.

Crestview Park is located at 1000 Crestview Drive in San Carlos.

Website: http://www.smcasastro.com/crestview-park.html

==================================

Saturday, 08/24/19
08:00 PM - 12:30 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Cosmic Alchemy in the Era of Gravitational Wave Astronomy - SOLD OUT

Enrico Ramirez-Ruiz is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). He is also the Niels Bohr Professor at the Niels Bohr Institute. After studying at the University of Cambridge, he was the John Bahcall Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Since joining the UCSC faculty in 2007, Ramirez-Ruiz has won a number of national awards for his research, including a Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the Kavli and Racliffe Fellowships. He is also a highly regarded teacher and public lecturer. In 2010, he was elected a member of the Mexican Academy of Sciences. Then 34, he was the youngest scientist ever elected to the academy.

Musical performers: Dave Rocha Quartet

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/music/2019august24.shtml

Cost: $50 - $199

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies


 
 
 



Monday, 08/05/19
01:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Berkeley Public Library Clarement Branch
2940 Benvenue
Berkeley, CA 94705

Space Phantasy Cartooning @Claremont

Graphic novelist and art mentor, Aaron Southerland, will hold a series of cartooning vibe sessions focused on outer space. The sessions are dedicated to the artsy students who desire to create and continue working on their own cartoon and comic characters. Aaron will provide guidance on drawing techniques using a variety of drawing materials.
Ideal for Grades 5-8.

Website: https://www.berkeleypubliclibrary.org/events/summer-cartooning-space-phantasy-claremont

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 08/05/19
07:30 PM - 09:00 PM

Benjamin Dean Astronomy Lectures
California Academy of Sciences
55 Music Concourse Dr.
San Francisco, CA 94118

The Universe in the Infrared: Spitzer’s Final Voyage

The infrared lies beyond the red end of the visible spectrum of light. Cool and dusty things throughout the Universe appear bright in infrared. The Spitzer Space Telescope is one of NASA’s Great Observatories, designed to observe the universe in infrared light. It was launched in 2003 with an expected lifetime of 5 years. Spitzer has succeeded beyond our wildest expectations, observing things from dust in our Solar System out to dusty galaxies at the edge of the Universe. On January 30, 2020, Spitzer will complete its mission. Dr. Rebull will summarize some of the interesting engineering that made this mission so successful, and cover several scientific highlights from the past 16 years of Spitzer operations.

Speaker: Luisa Rebull, Research Scientist, Caltech/IPAC

Website: https://www.calacademy.org/events/benjamin-dean-astronomy-lectures/the-universe-in-the-infrared-spitzer’s-final-voyage

Cost: $15 General, $12 Members and Seniors

==================================

Tuesday, 08/06/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

The future of TMT and the complex issues associated with Mauna Kea
Speakers: Bruce Macintosh and Risa Wechsler

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/future-tmt-and-complex-issues-associated-mauna-kea

Cost: Free

==================================

Tuesday, 08/06/19
12:30 PM - 01:30 PM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
2575 Sand Hill Rd
Bldg 48, Madrone Conference Room, Rm. 224
Menlo Park, CA 94025


The Magic of Red Galaxies: Tracing Structure Formation With Galaxy Clusters and More

Galaxy clusters, as the largest peaks in the cosmic density field, play an important role in astrophysics and cosmology. As the most dramatic features of large-scale structure, the abundance of clusters provides a key opportunity to test our understanding of structure formation and cosmic expansion history. In recent years, observational astrophysics has been revolutionized by large surveys, yielding large optical cluster catalogs allowing for precision tracking of the growth of structure. The red galaxies that enable efficient detection and measurement of galaxy clusters can also be used to track growth of structure over a larger mass range. In this talk, I will discuss the redMaPPer cluster finder and associated redMaGiC catalog of red galaxies, and applications to cosmological measurements in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). Along the way, I will highlight the new challenges that will be faced in the LSST era, including the importance of photometric calibration and galaxy blending.

Speaker: Eli Rykoff, KIPAC/SLAC

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/magic-red-galaxies-tracing-structure-formation-galaxy-clusters-and-more

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 08/08/19
06:00 PM - 10:00 PM

ExplOratorium
Pier 15 (Embarcadero at Green Street)
San Francisco, CA 94111

After Dark: LASERs

Everyone knows that Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation puts on a good show, but what else can it do? This 60-year-old technology started out as “a solution looking for a problem,” but it continues to enable scientific breakthroughs in communication, medicine, and observations of events light-years away. Focus on the history of LASERs along with live demonstrations of their potential and power to wow. Plus, aim your LASER focus on the cultivation and delicious uses of one of California's key crops at Pairings: Grapes.

Full Spectrum Science: Lasers With Ron Hipschman
7:00 and 8:30 p.m. | Osher Gallery 1, Kanbar Forum

In 1960, the laser was known as “a solution looking for a problem.” Now we can hardly imagine life without them. Learn what’s special about laser light, how it’s made, and how it’s used in everything from DVD players to eye surgery to fusion energy research. Join Exploratorium scientist Ron Hipschman for colorful explorations of the physical world at Full-Spectrum Science.

Pairings: Grapes With Jerrel KeyAuthor, Anita Oberholster, and Clay Reynolds
7:00 p.m. | Fisher Bay Observatory Gallery 6

Note: To reserve a seat and something to eat, pick up free tickets onsite at the Observatory starting at 6:00pm. Seating is limited to 120.

From lunchboxes to fine wines, grapes offer practically endless variations of flavor, texture, and use potential. Discover the wide world of grape varietals and unusual ways to prepare them carbonated, pickled, and dried into raisins with Exploratorium chef Jerrel KeyAuthor. Join Dr. Anita Oberholster for the latest research on increased wildfires and their impact on the West Coast’s wine grape-growing regions. And follow beverage guru Clay Reynolds back to the Gold Rush for a history (and a taste) of Pisco Punch, the San Francisco cocktail that “tastes like lemonade, but comes back with the kick of a roped steer.”

LaserImage With Cinema Arts

7:00 and 9:30 p.m. | Bechtel Gallery 3, Wattis Webcast Studio

LaserImage, by Ivan Dryer (1972, 11 min.)

You may know Ivan Dryer as the originator of commercial laser light shows, but before that fateful time, he was an aspiring filmmaker. In the early 1970s, Dryer partnered with Dr. Elsa Garmire, a California Institute of Technology physicist, to create an hour-long show for the Griffith Observatory Planetarium in Los Angeles. As a pitch, Dryer shot LaserImage, an 11-minute 16mm film that attempted to capture the beauty and fluidity of laser lights. Shooting against a black background, he filmed colorful laser lights and synchronized their movement to instrumental music, and gave us the laser light show we know today. Don’t miss this groundbreaking moment in film.

Laser Image: The Origin Story of Laserium With Kathleen Maguire
7:30 p.m. | Bechtel Gallery 3, Wattis Webcast Studio

Arts programmer and archivist Kathleen Maguire shines a light on the groovy history of the seminal laser light show, Laserium. Beginning with an experimental collaboration between filmmaker Ivan Dryer and physicist Dr. Elsa Garmire on a short film, the laser light show leapt from the movie screen to a large-scale, visual-musical spectacle that revolutionized planetarium attractions in the 1970s. Learn the history of the laser light show though its colorful ephemera and the first-hand experiences of the staff who helped support it.

Laser Lights and Metamaterials With Jay Lofy
9:00 p.m. | Bechtel Gallery 3, Wattis Webcast Studio

Cloaking and bending the speed of light isn’t science fiction it’s possible here and now. Learn about photonics and metamaterials that can reverse the speed of light and offer insight into the nature of time. Explore this new world of solid-state physics and laser light with Exploratorium Explainer Jay Lofy

Website: https://www.exploratorium.edu/visit/calendar/after-dark-august-8-2019

Cost: 17.95 advance, 19.95 door, AD members free

==================================

Thursday, 08/08/19
08:00 PM - 11:00 PM

City Star Parties - Point Lobos Parking Lot
El Camino Del Mar
San Francisco, CA 94121

City Star Party @ Point Lobos

Come join us for our monthly San Francisco City Star Party. SFAA members provide telescopes for your viewing pleasure.
Be sure to check the SFAA website for the latest updates…bad weather or overcast skies will cancel!

Website: https://www.sfaa-astronomy.org/events/cat_ids~55/%22%3e%20City%20Star%20Parties/

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 08/09/19
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC)
Building 51
3rd Floor Conference room
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Preparing for Full LSST Camera Integration and Testing

Speaker: Adam Snyder

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/preparing-full-lsst-camera-integration-and-testing

Cost: Free

==================================

Friday, 08/09/19
06:30 PM - 10:00 PM

Villa Montalvo Art Center
15400 Montalvo Rd
Saratoga, CA 95070

Montalvo Starry, Starry Night: Aliens and Exoplanets, and why ET has to phone long distance

Montalvo's annual art & astronomy slumber party returns! Inspired by our fascination with the night sky, this summer arts festival will feature an evening full of fun, family-friendly activities, including telescope viewing, art making, live performances, and a family-friendly movie on the Garden Terrace.

Prior to the movie screening, Simon Steel, Senior Director of Education and STEAM Programs at the SETI Institute, will offer a brief talk:

“Aliens and Exoplanets, and why ET has to phone long distance”

If ET visited Earth, where would he or she (or it) come from? Amazingly, astronomers are beginning to discover clues to answer this question. With a few simple props and some help from volunteers, we will find out that such a journey, if possible, is not as easy as it appears in the movies!

Guests have the option to conclude the evening by setting up their tents and camping out under the stars on the Great Lawn. The next morning, overnight participants will awaken to a hot cup of coffee and a continental breakfast on the front veranda of the historic Villa.

Website: https://seti.org/event/starry-starry-night-montalvo-arts-center

Cost: $20 General, $65/campsite (optional)

==================================

Friday, 08/09/19
08:00 PM - 12:30 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Lick Observatory Evening with the Stars - SOLD OUT
Speaker: Dr. Andreas Burkert, Univ. of Munich

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/stars/2019august9.shtml

Cost: $25

==================================

Friday, August 9, 2019
9:15 PM to 11:15 PM

San Jose Astronomical Association In-Town Star Party
Houge Park
3972 Twilight Dr · San Jose, CA
How to find us
Near the tennis courts

Come view the heavens through a telescope at the SJAA's In Town Star Party. Bring a scope to share the views, and if you do, feel free to come early to set up. Remember, this event is free, everyone is invited, no reservations required. Just show up!

==================================

Friday, 08/09/19
08:00 PM - 10:30 PM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Beginners Astrophotography Class

If YOU have ever wanted to try your hand at astrophotography or hone your existing skills, now is your chance!

This beginners’ class will be led by the President of the East Bay Astronomical Society, Richard Ozer, and will guide you through basic steps of astrophotography. The class ends with a guided session out on our Observation Deck.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/beginners-astrophotography-class/

Cost: $20

==================================

Fri. 08/09/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/09/2019 and Sat. 08/10/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/09/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/10/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 08/10/19
07:00 PM - 12:30 AM

Lick Observatory
7299 Mt. Hamilton Rd
Mt. Hamilton, CA 95140

Exploring Planets Orbiting Nearby Stars with the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and Lick Observatory - SOLD OUT

Courtney is an observational astronomer focused on detecting and characterizing planetary systems. Her research group uses telescopes on the ground (often at Lick Observatory!) and in space to search for planets, probe their atmospheres, measure their masses, and constrain their bulk compositions. She is curious about planet formation and evolution, the frequency of planetary systems in the Galaxy, and the prospects for detecting life on planets outside of our Solar System. Courtney is a member of the Target Selection and Follow-up Working Groups for the NASA Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite mission and the Science & Technology Definition Team for NASA's Large UV/Optical/Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR) mission concept study. She was awarded a Sloan Research Fellowship in 2019 for becoming "a world leader in the search for other worlds." Courtney previously obtained a bachelor's degree in Astrophysical Sciences from Princeton University, earned a Ph.D. and A.M. in Astronomy & Astrophysics from Harvard University, and completed a NASA Sagan Fellowship at Caltech. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Astronomy Department at UC Berkeley.

Speaker: Courtney Dressing, UC Berkeley

Musical performers: Folias Duo

Website: http://www.ucolick.org/summer/music/2019august10.shtml

Cost: $50 - $199

==================================

Saturday, 08/10/19 8:00 PM

Cushing Memorial ('Mountain') Amphitheater
Mt Tamalpais State Park
Pan Toll Road and Ridgecrest Blvd
Mill Valley, CA 94941

Astrobiology Under Our Feet & Out to the Stars

The Age of Astrobiology has begun. We have a whole Solar System - and a galaxy of star-warmed worlds beyond - to explore for life. How do we look for life here and way out there? How will we know it when we find it? Our exploration begins at Earth. We must apply what we are learning about our own amazing home planet to our search for life beyond.

Speaker: Penelope Boston, NASA Ames

Website: http://www.friendsofmttam.org/astronomy/schedule

Cost: Free

==================================

Saturday, 08/10/19
08:30 PM - 10:30 PM

College of San Mateo Bldg 36
1700 W Hillsdale Rd
San Mateo, CA 94402

Jazz Under the Stars

Come peer through our telescopes and see craters on the Moon, the visible planets, star clusters, and more while we listen to CSM's very own KCSM Jazz 91 FM. Dress warmly. Free parking in Marie Curie Lot 5. Directions are available on the Maps, Directions & Parking page.

Website: https://collegeofsanmateo.edu/astronomy/jazz.asp

Cost: Free

==================================

Sunday, 08/11/19
11:00 AM - 03:00 PM

Lawrence Hall of Science
1 Centennial Drive
Berkeley, CA 94720

Sunday Funday: International Year of the Periodic Table

2019 is the International Year of the Periodic Table! Join Lawrence Berkeley Lab as we have activities and discussions about why the periodic table deserves celebration. Learn about chemistry and why it is so important to our world, and then share a story about your favorite element.

NOTE: We were also a host for GSK Science in the Summer: The Science of Me and were able to bring science activities about the human body to libraries and community centers all around the Bay Area. On this Sunday Funday, we’re inviting all of the participants of the GSK Science in the Summer to come to the Hall for a Family Day. Children who participated in the program are FREE this day (adults pay admission)!

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar/sn/lhs.html?event_ID=126586&date=2019-08-11

Cost: Free with admission

==================================

Sunday, 08/11/19
02:00 PM - 03:30 PM

Alameda Free Library
1550 Oak St
Alameda, CA 94501

Wonderfest: Quantum Materials

Humanity's quest to understand matter has led to society-shaping technological breakthroughs. For example, the solid-state transistor underlies virtually all of modern computation. In complex quantum systems, exotic properties emerge which do not simply follow from the physical laws governing individual particles. A classic example is the phenomenon of superconductivity, which took scientists nearly 50 years to explain. Beyond useful applications, the study of quantum mechanical properties of crystalline materials - i.e., “condensed matter physics" - is a rich playground for exploring nature's deepest laws.

Speaker: Arielle Little, UC Berkeley

Website: http://wonderfest.org/quantum-materials/

Cost: Free

==================================

Monday, 08/12/19
11:00 PM - 03:00 AM

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Blvd
Oakland, CA 94619

Perseid Meteor Shower

Hang out on our new observation deck and be dazzled as you watch the spectacular Perseid Meteor Shower make it annual trip through our atmosphere and light up the night sky. Our astronomers are on hand to answer questions. Hot chocolate and other goodies will be available.

Website: https://chabotspace.org/calendar/perseid-meteor-shower/

Cost: TBA

==================================

Tuesday, 08/13/19
11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Varian Physics Building
382 Via Pueblo Mall
Room 355
Stanford, CA 94305

Evolution of SN1987A: From Progenitor Star To 30 Years After the Explosion

Speaker: Shigehiro Nagataki, Riken Institute

Website: https://kipac.stanford.edu/events/evolution-sn1987a-progenitor-star-30-years-after-explosion

Cost: Free

==================================

Thursday, 08/15/19
01:00 PM - 04:00 PM

Google Cloud
803 11th Ave
Sunnyvale, CA 94089

NASA Frontier Development Lab Artificial Institute Results Showcase

NASA Ames and the SETI Institute invite you to hear the results of this year's FDL AI research sprint. Join FDL's private sector partners and new space industry partners at what has become an exciting annual event.

Now in its fourth year, FDL's 8-week interdisciplinary research format has proved to be a successful model. FDL participants have delivered consistent and substantive AI applications over an extremely accelerated timespan.

By harnessing the expertise and enormous compute capacity of FDL's Silicon Valley partners (including Google Cloud, Intel AI, IBM, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Nvidia, Kx and Element AI) along with leaders in emerging space (such as the Luxembourg Space Agency, Canadian Space Agency, and Lockheed Martin), FDL is effectively using AI and machine learning to address important science and exploration questions.

This year the results showcase will be hosted at Google Cloud HQ, in Sunnyvale where FDL teams will share results in the following problem areas:

• EXPANDING THE CAPABILITIES OF NASA’S SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY.
• SUPER-RESOLUTION MAPS OF SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD COVERING 40 YEARS OF SPACE WEATHER EVENTS.
• ENHANCED PREDICTABILITY OF GNSS DISTURBANCES.
• LUNAR RESOURCE MAPPING / SUPER RESOLUTION.
• DISASTER PREVENTION, PROGRESS AND RESPONSE.
• GENERATION OF SIMULATED BIOSENSOR DATA
The exciting results of this year’s FDL will be followed by a Panel Discussion on the future of AI and space and Networking.

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/nasa-fdl-ai-results-showcase-2019-tickets-64577345579

Cost: Free with RSVP

==================================

Friday, 08/16/19 7:30 PM

Tri-Valley Stargazers
1893 N. Vasco Rd
Unitarian Universalist Church
Livermore, CA 94551

Chabot Observatory's Role in the Rescue of Apollo 13

In April, 1970 an explosion occurred aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft as it neared the Moon. All around the world various people from many walks of life leapt into action in many different roles to help save the astronauts' lives. One of the most unusual examples of this occurred at the old nearby Chabot Observatory in Oakland, where a number of nerdy and scientifically enthusiastic young high school and college kids tracked the Apollo 13 Capsule with several of the large telescopes there. It was my very great privilege to be one of those kids. Under the brilliant and energetic leadership of Dr. Terry Galloway, who had recently received his PhD from Caltech, we provided information that helped confirm that Apollo 13 was on the correct trajectory to safely return to earth.

In my talk, using images, charts, old newspapers, the Apollo 13 accident report, and videos from various documentaries about Apollo 13 as well as the Ron Howard movie, I will go into some substantial detail as to what the profile of a "normal" Apollo mission would be like, why and how the Apollo 13 accident occurred, and how the accident lead to a deviation from normal navigational procedures that made Chabot's and other observatories optical observations more important, especially the night before reentry. I'll describe how magical, majestic and beautiful the command and service module and the third stage of the Saturn Five looked through Rachel, the 20 inch refractor at Chabot, as they stately drifted through space across the field of view. I will discuss the normal role and function of the deep space network and how it changed on this mission, as well as a very little known but very important fact about the DSN that puts the story into a very different light. I will also tell the amazing and unbelievable story of how our efforts at Chabot Observatory became a remarkable example of how important astronomy outreach can be and how it changed the future!

Finally, for fun, we will see a couple of segments from the Ron Howard Apollo 13 movie (which, to make clear, I love!) and we will play the "How many scientific, engineering, and factual errors can you find?" game.

Speaker: Dave Rodrigues, East Bay Astronomical Society

Website: http://www.trivalleystargazers.org

Cost: Free

==================================

Fri. 08/16/2019 7PM

Telescope Makers Workshop
Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450

Chabot's TMW is one of only a handful of regularly scheduled telescope making workshops in the U.S., and probably the world; it meets every Friday evening throughout the year, except Memorial Day weekend. It has been in operation since December of 1930, founded by Franklin B. Wright, and is currently run by Eastbay Astronomical Society member Rich Ozer, with help from other EAS members, Dave Barosso, Barry Leska, and others. The price of admission is FREE. All you have to do is show up, buy a mirror blank and a "tool" (typically around $100 - $200 depending on the size of the mirror) and start "pushin' glass!" We supply you with instruction, the various grits you'll need to first grind, and then polish and figure your mirror, and all the testing equipment needed. With a small bit of luck, you could wind up with a telescope that costs 1/3 or 1/4 the cost of a store-bought telescope, that is yet optically superior! Itdoes take time - depending on how much time you put in on it, and other factors, it could take a few months or several months. But, it's a fun project, great for kids, and at the end you get a great telescope!

For more information call or email Richard Ozer at pres zazt eastbayastro.org.

==================================

Fri. 08/16/2019 and Sat. 08/17/2019

Chabot Space and Science Center
10000 Skyline Boulevard
Oakland, CA 94619-2450
(510) 336-7300

EXPLORE THE NIGHT SKIES AT THE CHABOT OBSERVATORIES
for more information: http://www.chabotspace.org/
Free Telescope Viewing
Regular hours are every Friday & Saturday evening, weather permitting: 7:30pm -10:30pm
Come for spectacular night sky viewing the best kept secret in the Bay Area and see the magnificence of our telescopes in action!

Daytime Telescope Viewing On Saturday and Sunday afternoons come view the sun, moon, or Venus through Chabot's telescopes. Free with General Admission.

12pm - 5pm: Observatories Open (weather permitting)

==================================

Fri. 08/16/2019 9PM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill Observatory is open for public viewing every clear Friday evening from 9:00 p.m. until 11:00 p.m. Visitors can view the wonders of the universe through the observatory's computer-controlled 16- inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope.
Views of objects in our solar system may include craters and mountains on the moon, the moons and cloud-bands of Jupiter, the rings of Saturn, etc. Deep space objects including star clusters, nebulae, and distant galaxies also provide dramatic demonstrations of the vastness of the cosmos.The choice of targets for any evening's viewing depends on the season and what objects are currently in the sky.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

Come to Foothill Observatory and join us in the exploration of our Universe!

==================================

Sat. 08/17/2019 10AM

Foothill College
12345 El Monte Rd
Los Altos Hills, CA 94022

Foothill College Observatory 10AM-12PM if it is clear Solar observing with a Hydrogen alpha solar telescope every clear Saturday morning. This allows spectacular views of solar prominences and unusual surface features on the Sun not otherwise visible with regular white light telescopes.

Admission is free. Parking is $3

Foothill Observatory is located on the campus of Foothill College in Los Altos Hills, CA. Take Highway 280 to the El Monte Rd exit. The observatory is next to parking lot 4. Parking at the college requires visitor parking permits that are available from the machines in the parking lots for $3.00. Dispensers accept one-dollar bills and quarters; bring exact change. Citations are issued.

==================================

Saturday, 08/17/19
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Campbell Hall, Rm 131
UC Berkeley
Berkeley, CA 94720

Black Holes, Big and Small- A laser-guided adaptive optics view

Black holes come in at least two varieties. Supermassive black holes lay at the centers of galaxies and, while not theoretically predicted, have been definitively proven to exist using observations of stars’ orbits at the heart of the Milky Way. Stellar mass black holes are predicted to exist in large numbers - 100 million in our Galaxy alone - but only two dozen have been found, all in binaries.

Prof. Lu will present past, current, and upcoming experiments to hunt for the invisible stellar mass black holes and study how the supermassive black hole at the Galactic Center impacts its environment. These experiments utilize the power of the world’s largest telescopes equipped with laser-guide star adaptive optics to correct image blurring from the Earth’s turbulent atmosphere. Prof. Lu will also discuss how advances in adaptive optics will sharpen our view of the Universe for black hole research and beyond.

Speaker: Jessica Lu, UC Berkeley

Website: http://events.berkeley.edu/index.php/calendar.html?event_ID=126754&date=2019-08-17&tab=lectures

Cost: Free

==================================

Posted by Ken Lum

Re-posted by Bob Fies

 

 
 
 
 
 

Last Month